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New York Health Careers

June 2012

What Do Anesthesia Technologists and Technicians Do?

Anesthesia technologists and technicians are trained members of the anesthesia patient care team, with extensive knowledge of all anesthesia equipment and supplies. Under direct supervision, they assist anesthesiologists and certified nurse anesthetists in anesthetizing patients during routine and complex surgical cases in the operating room and outpatient surgical settings. Anesthesia technologists and technicians provide support by preparing and maintaining equipment and supplies used to deliver anesthesia and by monitoring devices and anesthesia delivery systems before, during, and after procedures.

Depending on individual expertise and training, the tasks of anesthesia technologists and technicians may include equipment maintenance and services such as cleaning, sterilizing, assembling, calibrating and testing, troubleshooting, requisitioning, and recording of inspections and maintenance. They may also operate a variety of equipment used to monitor, evaluate, and manage the patient undergoing anesthesia.

The anesthesia technologist may perform inspection, maintenance of inventories, and service records. They may also provide support in areas of pressure monitoring, autotransfusion, and laboratory functions. They maintain and organize the anesthesia environment, equipment, supplies, and personnel to facilitate department functions. The anesthesia technologist also provides peri-operative technical support to the anesthesia professional medical staff for delivery of patient care.

The anesthesia technician may perform first level maintenance on anesthesia equipment and clean, sterilize, disinfect, and stock orders, and maintain the routine anesthesia equipment and supplies.

For further information about the roles and duties of anesthesia technologists and technicians, please visit the American Society of Anesthesia Technologists and Technicians (ASATT) website and the standards of practice page.

Where Do Anesthesia Technologists and Technicians Work?

Anesthesia technologists and technicians work mostly in hospitals and outpatient surgical settings. They may work in the operating room, anesthesia work room, post anesthesia recovery room, intensive care units, and in outpatient surgery rooms.

What Do Anesthesia Technologists and Technicians Earn?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not yet publish employment and earnings data for anesthesia technologists and technicians. According to salary.com, the average salary for anesthesia technicians in the United States was approximately $40,945 in 2019, slightly lower than the average salary of $42,695 in New York State.

New York Educational/Licensure Requirements

A high school diploma is required to train to work as an anesthesia technologist and technician. In some cases, a two-year degree in a health care occupation may be required or an equivalent of two to four years of experience in a health care field. It may also be required to complete an anesthesia technician trainee program to become knowledgeable with standard concepts, practices, and procedures within the field.

Although New York does not require anesthesia technologists and technicians to be licensed, it’s recommended that anesthesia technologists and technicians acquire voluntary professional certification. ASATT has the only nationally recognized certification for the anesthesia technicians (Cer AT). In order to maintain certification, technicians must earn 20 continuing education contact hours. Certification is granted for a two-year period. Certification for the technologist level has recently been developed. Technologists must obtain a minimum of 30 continuing education hours to maintain certification. Please visit the ASATT certification website page for more details.

Education Programs in the New York region (subject to change)

Stony Brook University
School of Health Technology and Management
101 Nicolls Road
Stony Brook, NY 11794
(631) 444-2252

Additional Web Links

For more information, go to American Society of Anesthesia Technologists and Technicians: http://www.asatt.org/.

HC-RSI

What Do Athletic Trainers and Exercise Physiologists Do?

Athletic trainers specialize in preventing, diagnosing, and treating muscle and bone injuries and illnesses. Exercise physiologists develop fitness and exercise programs that help patients recover from chronic diseases and improve cardiovascular function, body composition, and flexibility.

Athletic trainers work with people of all ages and all skill levels, from children to professional athletes and soldiers to industrial workers. They are usually one of the first health care providers on the scene when injuries occur during sports games. They work under the direction of a licensed physician and with other health care providers, and often discuss specific injuries and treatment options or evaluate and treat patients as directed by a physician. Athletic trainers will assess, recognize, and evaluate injuries; provide first aid or emergency care; develop and carry out rehabilitation programs for injured sports enthusiasts and athletes; plan and implement comprehensive programs to prevent injury and illness; and perform administrative tasks, such as keeping records and writing reports on injuries and treatment programs.

Exercise physiologists work to improve overall patient health, and many of their patients suffer from health problems such as cardiovascular disease or obesity. Exercise physiologists provide health education and exercise plans to improve key health indicators. Some exercise physiologists work closely with primary physicians. Exercise physiologists will analyze a patient’s medical history to determine the best possible exercise and fitness regimen; perform fitness tests with medical equipment and analyze the subsequent patient data; measure body fat, blood pressure, oxygen usage, and other key patient health indicators; develop exercise programs to improve patient health; and supervise clinical tests to ensure patient safety.

For additional information, go to: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/athletic-trainers.htm and https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/exercise-physiologists.htm

Where Do Athletic Trainers and Exercise Physiologists Work?

Many jobs for athletic trainers are sports related, although there are non-sports related jobs available, too. Athletic trainers work in colleges and universities, high schools, fitness centers, professional athletic organizations, and health care organizations. Many athletic trainers work in educational facilities, such as secondary schools and colleges. Others may work in physicians’ offices or for professional sports teams. Some athletic trainers work in rehabilitation and therapy clinics, in the military, or with performing artists.

Exercise physiologists work in hospitals, outpatient clinics, and university laboratories. They may also work in fitness centers and with health care organizations.

For athletic trainers and exercise physiologists who work in health care settings, hours and schedules may be more structured. For those who work in fitness centers, sports settings, or with sports teams, their schedules may vary greatly, with longer than eight-hour days sometimes, and some nights and weekends required.

For more information on projections of athletic trainers and exercise physiologists by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

What Do Athletic Trainers and Exercise Physiologists Earn?

In 2018, the average annual income reported by BLS for athletic trainers in New York was $48,890, slightly lower than the 2018 national average annual income for athletic trainers of $49,280. During the same year, the average annual income for exercise physiologists in New York was $68,090, considerably higher than the national average annual income for exercise physiologists of $54,760.

Supply and Demand

According to U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics projections, employment of athletic trainers is expected to grow by 22.8% nationwide between 2016 and 2026, and by 27.7% in New York during the same time period. Also, employment of exercise physiologists is expected to grow 31.1% nationwide and 15.6% in New York between 2016 and 2026.

New York Educational Requirements

Athletic trainers and exercise physiologists need at least a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university. Master’s degree programs are also common in both professions. Both athletic training and exercise physiologist degree programs have classroom and clinical components, including science and health-related courses, such as biology, anatomy, physiology, physics, and nutrition.

In New York, certified athletic trainers have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree from an athletic training program that is registered by the New York State Education Department as licensure qualifying. Exercise physiologists have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in exercise physiology and may choose to become board certified by the American Society of Exercise Physiologists (ASEP).

New York Certification/Licensure Requirements

New York mandates that all individuals using the title “certified athletic trainer” be licensed. To become licensed, individuals must have graduated from an accredited educational program or meet minimal course work requirements as specified by the New York State Education Department. For more information on the requirements, go to http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/at/athletlic.htm.

To meet the examination requirements for licensure as a certified athletic trainer, an individual must obtain satisfactory scores on athletic training examinations acceptable to the New York State Education Department. The certification examination of the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) Board of Certification, Inc. (BOC) is an acceptable examination. For more information on that examination, go to www.bocatc.org. For more information about accreditation, go to the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education: www.caate.net.

Licensure for exercise physiologists is not required in New York. Compared to athletic trainers, licensure for exercise physiologists is less common and, therefore, there are fewer recognized standards of practice for exercise physiologists. Nonetheless, exercise physiologists can stand out by earning professional certifications in their field. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) offers a Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist certification for graduate degree holders and a Certified Clinical Exercise Specialist credential is available to bachelor’s degree holders.

Financial Support

NATA offers several types of scholarships, including the NATA Foundation Scholarship Program which awards undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral scholarships to students of athletic training. Information can be found at: https://natafoundation.org/education/scholarships/. Also, NATA has additional information about studying to become an athletic trainer and financial aid and scholarships programs for students at https://www.nata.org/professional-interests/students. The New York State Athletic Trainers’ Association also has information on scholarships and awards. ACSM Foundation offers some awards and grants. These may be found at: https://www.acsm.org/acsm-membership/support-acsm-foundation .

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Alfred University
1 Saxon Drive
Alfred, NY 14802
(607) 871-2111
Canisius College
2001 Main Street
Buffalo, NY 14208-1517
(716) 888-2200
Dominican College
470 Western Highway
Orangeburg, NY 10962
(845) 359-7800
Hofstra University
101 Hofstra Dome
Hempstead, NY 11549
(516) 463-6600
Ithaca College
953 Danby Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 274-3011
Marist College
3399 North Road
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601
(845)-575-3000
The College at Brockport-SUNY
Exercise Science and Athletic Trainer
350 New Campus Drive
Brockport, NY 14420
(585)-395-2211
SUNY Cortland
21 Graham Ave
Cortland, NY 13045
(607) 753-2011
Stony Brook University- SUNY
101 Nicolls Rd
Stony Brook, NY 11794
(631) 444-2252
Daemen College
4380 Main Street
Amherst, NY 14226
(800) 462-7652
Long Island University-LIU
Brooklyn Campus
School of Health Professions
1 University Plaza
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 488-1011
Rochester Institute of Technology
Exercise Science
1 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 475-2411
SUNY Morrisville
Human Performance and Heath Promotion 
80 Eaton St.
Morrisville, NY  13408
(315) 684-6000
SUNY Potsdam
Exercise Science
44 Pierrepont Ave
Potsdam, NY 13676
(315) 267-2000
Syracuse University
Exercise Science
900 S Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244
(315) 443-1870
Onondaga Community College
Exercise Science
4585 W Seneca Turnpike
Syracuse, NY 13215
(315) 498-2000
Columbia University
Teachers College
Movement Science & Education
525 W 120th St
New York, NY 10027
(212)678-3000
Queens College-CUNY
Exercise Science
65-30 Kissena Blvd
Queens, NY 11367
(718) 997-5000
Mercy College
Exercise Science
555 Broadway
Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522
(914) 674-7600
University at Buffalo
Exercise Physiology Concentration/
Athletic Training MS
12 Capen Hall
Buffalo, NY 14260
(716) 645-2000
Skidmore College
Health & Human Physiological Science
815 N Broadway
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
(518) 580-5000
Brooklyn College-CUNY
Exercise Science
2900 Bedford Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11210
(718) 951-5000
Dutchess Community College
Exercise Science
53 Pendell Rd
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601
(845) 431-8000
Kingsborough Community College
2001 Oriental Blvd
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718) 368-5000
Bronx Community College
Exercise Science
2155 University Ave
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 289-5895
Hudson Valley Community College
Exercise Science
80 Vandenburgh Ave
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 629-4822

Additional Web Links

For more information on Athletic Training, go to the Board of Certification: www.bocatc.org, the Office of the Professions, New York State Education Department: www.op.nysed.gov/prof/at/, the National Athletic Trainers Association: http://www.nata.org/, and the New York State Athletic Trainers’ Association.

For more information on Exercise Physiology, go to the American Society of Exercise Physiologists (ASEP) and American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

What Do Cancer/Tumor Registrars Do?

Cancer/tumor registrars compile and maintain records of patients treated for cancer. They utilize a tumor registry data system that is used by physicians, government agencies, and researchers. Cancer/Tumor registrars review patient records to identify and compile patient data for use in cancer management programs and to comply with government regulations. They review and code information from patient medical records, such as demographic characteristics, history and extent of disease, diagnostic procedures, and treatments. They may also contact discharged patients, their families, and their physicians to ensure the registry includes follow-up information, such as quality of life and length of survival of cancer patients. Cancer/tumor registrars also prepare statistical and narrative reports and graphic presentations of cancer/tumor registry data for use by hospital staff and researchers.

Where Do Cancer/Tumor Registrars Work?

Cancer/tumor registrars work in cancer registries, which may be at institutional (e.g., hospitals), state, or regional organizations, or as consultants when they are certified as cancer/tumor registrars.

What Do Cancer/Tumor Registrars Earn?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not yet publish employment and earnings data for cancer/tumor registrars. According to salary.com, the average salary for cancer/tumor registrars in the United States was approximately $51,972 in 2019, slightly lower than the average salary of $54,193 in New York State. For more information on salary considerations for cancer/tumor registrars, click on: www.ncra-usa.org/Advocacy/Workforce/Salary-Considerations

Supply and Demand

According to the National Cancer Registrars Association (NCRA) website, there are over 5,000 cancer registrars in the U.S. Excellent potential for employment growth continues in government agencies, as well as insurance, pharmaceutical, and other health care industries as accurate, timely data increasingly impact cancer control efforts. Cancer/tumor registrars who possess knowledge of management and administration, medical sciences, medical coding, programming, database management, and data retrieval and analysis will find a ready market for those skills.

Educational Requirements

Cancer/tumor registrars are sometimes trained on the job or most often in formal education programs and online courses. Curricula may include courses on cancer and its management, cancer program management, medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, biostatistics and epidemiology, cancer data abstracting, database record management, and cancer registry procedures. Most hospitals and central cancer registries require their employees to hold the CTR credential. Individuals may be hired without having the CTR credential, though most employment opportunities do ask for it.

New York Certification/Licensure Requirements

New York has no licensure requirements for cancer/tumor registrars. Individuals wishing to demonstrate proficiency in their occupation may receive certification through national organizations such as the NCRA: http://www.ncra-usa.org/CTR.

Financial Support

Limited financial aid and scholarships are available from colleges and from other organizations that provide cancer/tumor registrar training. In addition, the NCRA Education Foundation is a nonprofit organization with the mission of supporting the advancement of the cancer registry profession through education and research. The Foundation supports its mission by assuring education, training, and resources are available for cancer registry professionals in order to provide quality data. More information may be available at their website: http://www.ncra-usa.org/Foundation

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

At this time, there are no schools in New York offering this education program.

Additional Web Links

For more information on cancer/tumor registrars, go to

National Cancer Registrars Association: http://www.ncra-usa.org;

New York Cancer Registrars Association (NYCRA): http://nycra.homestead.com/welcome.html

Metropolitan New York Cancer Registrars Association (MNYCRA): http://nycra.homestead.com/MNYCRA.html 

Long Island Cancer Registrars Association (LICRA): http://nycra.homestead.com/LICRA.html

North American Association of Central Cancer Registries: http://www.naaccr.org/;

National Program of Cancer Registries: http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/npcr/index.htm.

 

What Do Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians Do?

Cardiovascular technologists and technicians assist physicians in diagnosing and treating cardiac (heart) and peripheral vascular (blood vessel) ailments. They may specialize in any of three areas of practice: invasive cardiology, echocardiography, and vascular technology.

Cardiovascular technologists who specialize in invasive procedures are called cardiology technologists. They assist physicians with cardiac catheterization procedures in which a small tube, or catheter, is inserted in patients to remove blood vessel obstructions. Those who assist physicians in the diagnosis of disorders affecting circulation are known as vascular technologists or vascular sonographers. Technologists who use ultrasound to examine the heart chambers, valves, and vessels are referred to as cardiac sonographers or echocardiographers. 

 Cardiac technologists also help prepare patients for cardiac catheterization. During the procedures, they monitor the patient’s blood pressure and heart rate with electrocardiogram (EKG) equipment and notify the physician of any abnormalities with these indicators. Cardiovascular technologists may also prepare and monitor patients during open-heart surgery and during the insertion of pacemakers and stents that open up blockages in arteries to the heart and major blood vessels.

Cardiovascular technicians work closely with cardiac technologists. Those technicians who specialize in EKGs, stress testing, and Holter monitors are known as cardiographic technicians or EKG technicians. Technicians typically receive less training and make less than technologists.

For more information, go to: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/diagnostic-medical-sonographers.htm

 Where Do Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians Work?

The majority of cardiovascular technologist and technician jobs are in hospitals (state, local, and private) and others work in physician’s offices, medical laboratories, diagnostic imaging centers, and outpatient care centers. Cardiovascular technologists and technicians generally work a five-day, 40-hour week that may include weekends. Those in catheterization laboratories tend to work longer hours and may work evenings. They may also be on call during the night and on weekends.

What Do Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time cardiovascular technologists and technicians nationwide was $58,730, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that cardiovascular technologists and technicians in New York earned an average annual salary of $61,610, (entry level-$40,080, experienced- $72,370).

Supply and Demand

From 2016 to 2026, nationwide employment of cardiovascular technologists and technicians is projected to grow by more than 9.9%, and in New York by more than 16.3% during the same period. For more information on projections of cardiovascular technologists/technicians by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

Growth will occur as the population ages because older people have a higher incidence of heart problems and use more diagnostic imaging. Employment of vascular technologists and echocardiographers will grow as advances in vascular technology and sonography reduce the need for more costly and invasive procedures. However, fewer EKG technicians will be needed, as hospitals train nursing aides and others to perform basic EKG procedures. Individuals trained in Holter monitoring and stress testing are expected to have more favorable job prospects than are those who can perform only a basic EKG.

New York Educational Requirements

The majority of cardiovascular technologists complete at least a two-year college program and earn an associate degree, but four-year programs are increasingly available. The first year is often dedicated to core courses and is followed by a year of specialized instruction in invasive or noninvasive cardiovascular or vascular technology. Those who are qualified in an allied health profession may only need to complete one year of specialized instruction, which may occur on the job. Specific requirements are likely to vary depending on the facility hiring a cardiovascular technologist or technician.

New York Certification/Licensure Requirements

New York does not require cardiovascular technologists and technicians to be licensed. However, many employers prefer professionally certified technicians and technologists.

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Molloy College
Cardiovascular Technology
1000 Hempstead Ave.
Rockville Centre, NY 11571-5002
(516) 323-3388
Hudson Valley Community College
Diagnostic Cardiac Sonography
80 Vandenburgh Ave
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 629-4822
New Age Training
Electrocardiography (EKG) Technician
145 West 30th St. 8th Floor
New York, NY  10001
(212) 947-7940
Manhattan Institute
Electrocardiography (EKG) Technician
45 W 34th St
New York, NY 10001
(347) 220-8181
Rochester Institute of Technology
Echocardiography (Cardiac Ultrasound)
One Lomb Memorial Dr
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 475-2411
 

Additional Web Links

For more information on cardiovascular technologists and technicians, go to:

Alliance of Cardiovascular Professionals: http://www.acp-online.org

Society for Vascular Ultrasound: http://www.svunet.org

Cardiovascular Credentialing International: http://www.cci-online.org

What Do Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists Do

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) are advanced practice nurses who specialize in providing anesthesia and related care before and after surgical, therapeutic, diagnostic, and obstetrical procedures. They also provide pain management and emergency services. CRNAs develop individualized anesthetic care plans for each patient using a full range of anesthetic techniques, drugs, and technology. They also participate in preoperative patient education and assess and observe patients before, during, and after surgical procedures.

CRNAs often serve in administrative roles in anesthesia departments and their duties may include personnel and resource management, financial management, quality assurance, and risk management. They also participate as instructors for continuing education programs and serve as advisors to institutions as well as state and federal agencies.

For more information, please go to: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nurse-anesthetists-nurse-midwives-and-nurse-practitioners.htm.

Where Do Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists Work?

CRNAs work with surgeons, obstetricians, dentists, podiatrists, and anesthesiologists and may work in hospitals, physician anesthesiologist groups, CRNA groups, or are self-employed.

What Do Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, certified registered nurse anesthetists nationwide was $174,790, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that, certified registered nurse anesthetists in New York earned an average annual salary of $184,140, (entry level-$131,980, experienced- $210,220).

Supply and Demand

With an increasing number of surgeries in the U.S. and an aging population, the demand for CRNAs is expected to increase well into the next decade. The BLS estimates that for the time period of 2016-2026, the employment of nurse anesthetists will increase by 16.2% nationwide and by 25.7% in New York.

For more information on projections of certified registered nurse anesthetists by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

New York Education Program Requirements

Registered nurses interested in a career as a CRNA in New York must be licensed with a bachelor’s of science in nursing and have at least one year of acute care nursing experience before applying to a graduate school of nurse anesthesia.

Most CRNA graduate education programs are 24-36 months long with curriculum that includes classroom and clinical experience. The classroom curriculum emphasizes anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, biochemistry, chemistry, physics, and pharmacology as related to anesthesia. The major clinical component provides experience with a variety of anesthesia techniques and procedures for all types of surgery and obstetrics.

All nurse anesthesia education programs offer a master’s degree. Depending on the particular program, the degrees are in nursing, allied health, or biological and clinical sciences.

New York Certification/Licensure Requirements

In order to practice as a CRNA in New York, candidates must hold a valid New York registered nursing license, have completed an accredited CRNA education program, and pass a national certification examination. To maintain certification, at least 40 hours of continuing education are required every two years.

Financial Support

The AANA offers some funding and scholarship opportunities to CRNA students or CRNAs who are AANA members. For additional information, visit the AANA Foundation website.

Educational Programs in New York (subject to change)

SUNY Downstate Medical Center
College of Nursing
450 Clarkson Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 270-1000
University at Buffalo – SUNY
School of Nursing
South Campus
Buffalo, NY 14214-8013
(716) 829-2537
Columbia University
School of Nursing
560 W 168th St
New York, NY 10032
(212) 305-5756
Albany Medical College
Center for Nurse Anesthesiology
16 New Scotland Ave
Albany, NY 12208
(518) 262-4303

Additional Web Links

For more information on CRNAs, visit this fact sheet from the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists at: http://www.aana.com/ceandeducation/becomeacrna/Pages/Nurse-Anesthetists-at-a-Glance.aspx

or the New York State Association of Nurse Anesthetists website at: http://www.nysana.com/

What Do Chiropractors Do?

Chiropractors are licensed health professionals who diagnose and treat patients with problems related to the musculoskeletal system, which is made up of bones, muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Chiropractors use spinal manipulation and other techniques to treat patients’ ailments, such as back or neck pain.

Chiropractors focus on patients’ overall health. Many believe that misalignments of the spinal joints interfere with a person’s nervous system and can result in lower resistance to disease and many different conditions of diminished health.

Chiropractors will typically analyze a patient’s posture and spine and use manual and mechanical manipulation of the spinal column and vertebrae to treat ailments, such as back or neck pain. They may also conduct additional diagnostic tests, including evaluating a patient’s posture or taking x-rays, and advise patients on health and lifestyle issues, such as exercise and sleep habits. A chiropractor may also refer patients to other medical specialists, if needed.

Chiropractors do not prescribe drugs or perform surgery. They focus on a holistic approach, recognizing the many factors that affect health, including exercise, diet, rest, environment, and heredity. Their therapeutic interventions may also include the use of water, light, massage, ultrasound, electric or heat therapy, and support equipment. Chiropractors often specialize in areas such as sports injuries, neurology, orthopedics, or pediatrics.

For more information, go to: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/chiropractors.htm

Where Do Chiropractors Work?

Most chiropractors are self-employed and work in a solo or group practice. A small number teach, conduct research at chiropractic institutions, or work in hospitals and clinics.

What Do Chiropractors Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, chiropractors nationwide was $85,870, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that chiropractors in New York earned an average annual salary of $91,290, (entry level-$66,850, experienced- $103,510).

Supply and Demand

Employment of chiropractors nationwide is expected to increase 12.5% between 2016 and 2026, and increase in New York by 20.5% for the same period. Projected job growth stems from increasing consumer demand for alternative methods of health care. The rapidly growing elderly population will likely increase the demand for chiropractic services, too, due to the prevalence of mechanical and structural problems in this population. Also, the non-surgical, holistic approach used by chiropractors is becoming more accepted and popular across the nation.

For more information on projections of chiropractors by New York State labor regions, click here.

New York Education Requirements

In order to become a chiropractor, an individual should expect to complete seven to eight years of post-high school study, including three to four years of undergraduate education, followed by a four-year Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) degree program. Many students earn a bachelor’s degree before going on to a chiropractic program, although it is not required. Many chiropractors also earn master’s degrees in related areas, such as nutrition or sports rehabilitation.

For the first two years of chiropractic study, students are trained in classroom and laboratory settings, and study anatomy, physiology, microbiology, public health, pathology, and biochemistry. During the last two years of the program, students focus on clinical experiences in manipulation and spinal adjustment and also study nutrition, neurology, orthopedics, geriatrics, and physiotherapy.

New York Licensure Requirements

In order to be licensed as a chiropractor in New York, an individual with a DC degree from an accredited school of chiropractic must pass the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE) four-part examination.

For more information: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/chiro/chirolic.htm

Financial Support

The New York College of Chiropractic offers a variety of scholarships in amounts of $1,500 to $2,500 annually for students of merit and academic achievement. Please see the NYCC website for details: Click here

Education Programs in the New York (subject to change)

New York Chiropractic College
2360 State Route 89
Seneca Falls, NY 13148
(800) 234-6922
D’Youville College
320 Porter Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14201
(716) 829-8000

Additional Web Links

For more information on chiropractors, go to:

The American Chiropractic Association website at: http://www.acatoday.org; or

The New York State Chiropractic Association website at: http://www.nysca.com/; or

The Federation of Chiropractic Licensing Boards website at: http://www.fclb.org/.

What Do Creative Arts Therapists Do?

Creative arts therapists use active engagement in art, dance or movement, drama, and music as therapeutic approaches to address mental, emotional, developmental, and behavioral disorders of their clients. Creative arts therapists work with individuals of all ages who may have a variety of mental or physical health issues, including those who are temporarily or permanently disabled. Creative arts therapists, working with clients one-on-one or in groups, strive to use creative processes to bring out artistic self-expression to help people resolve conflicts and problems, develop interpersonal skills, manage behavior, reduce stress, increase self-esteem and self-awareness, and achieve insight. Creative art therapy is also used to help people manage stress and promote overall mental and physical well-being.

Creative arts therapists are often part of a larger multidisciplinary rehabilitation team coordinating to develop and implement a client’s therapeutic goals and objectives. Using their skills in art, dance or movement, drama, and music in conjunction with psychotherapeutic theories and methods, creative arts therapists are able to elicit thoughts and feelings from clients to supplement traditional “talk” psychotherapeutic methods. Creative arts therapy uses the relationship between the patient and the therapist in the context of the artistic process as a dynamic force for change and expression.

Where Do Creative Arts Therapists Work?

Creative arts therapists work in a number of institutional and community settings, including hospitals; nursing homes; correctional institutions; adult shelters; schools; community centers; adolescent, substance abuse, and mental health group homes or half-way houses; and adult day care programs. Creative arts therapists usually work a 40-hour week, though they may work some evenings and weekends to account for working with the different populations they serve in non-traditional settings.

What Do Creative Arts Therapists Earn?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not yet publish employment and earnings data for creative art therapists. In 2018 however, the American Art Therapy Association (AATA) published preliminary findings based on a 2016 membership survey. According to the data, one quarter of respondents reported salary ranges from $30,000-$49,999 (28.8%) and another quarter of respondents reported salary ranges $50,000-$79,999 (26.3%). For more information, please visit the AATA, website.

Supply and Demand

According to recruiter.com, the demand for Art Therapists is expected to go up, with an expected 5,870 new jobs filled by 2018. This represents an annual increase of 3.52 percent over the next few years.

New York Educational Requirements

For creative arts therapists, an undergraduate college education should include coursework in both creative arts and psychopathology, with specific courses in general, developmental, and abnormal psychology. Some colleges may offer an undergraduate degree in creative arts therapy, but a master’s degree or doctorate degree in creative arts therapy or substantial equivalent is required for licensure in New York. Advanced degree programs include additional coursework in fine arts, psychotherapy, and clinical internships.

New York Certification/Licensure Requirements

To be licensed in New York as a creative arts therapist, an individual must have a master’s or doctorate degree in creative arts therapy from a registered, accredited program, or its equivalent and at least 1,500 hours of supervised experience in an approved setting. In addition, an individual must pass one of three exams: the Art Therapy Credentials Board (ATCB) test, the Certification Board for Music Therapists (CBMT) test, or the New York State Case Narrative Exam. For more information on New York State licensure requirements, go to: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/mhp/catlic.htm.

Financial Support

In addition to school-based scholarships, scholarships for undergraduate and graduate education are available through national organizations:

for art therapists: http://www.americanarttherapyassociation.org/aata-awards/;

for music therapists: http://www.musictherapy.org/careers/scholars/; and

for dance therapists: https://adta.org/encouraging-scholarship/.

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

The following programs offer bachelor’s and/or master’s degrees in one or more of the creative arts therapies:

Hofstra University
Creative Arts Therapy
1000 Hempstead Turnpike
Hempstead, NY 11549
(516) 463-6600
Long Island University
C.W. Post Campus
Clinical Art Therapy
720 Northern Boulevard
Brooklville, NY 11548
(516) 299-2999
Molloy College
Music Therapy
1000 Hempstead Avenue
Rockville Centre, NY 11571
(516) 323-3000
Nazareth College
Creative Arts Therapy
4245 East Avenue
Rochester, NY 14618
(585) 389-2525
NYU Steinhardt
Art Therapy
34 Stuyvesant Street
New York, NY 10003
(212) 998-5700
Pratt Institute
Creative Arts Therapy Dept.
200 Willoughby Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11205
(718) 636-3600
SUNY New Paltz
Music Therapy
1 Hawk Drive
New Paltz, NY 12561
(845) 257-7869
SUNY at Fredonia
Music Therapy
280 Central Ave.
Fredonia, NY 14063
(716) 673-3111
Buffalo State- SUNY
Art Therapy
1300 Elmwood Ave
Buffalo, NY 14222
(716) 878-4106
School of Visual Arts
Art Therapy
132 West 21st St., 3rd floor
New York, NY 10010
(212) 592-2000
Russell Sage College
Creative Arts in Therapy
65 1st Street
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 244-2000
SUNY Plattsburgh
Art Therapy
101 Broad Street
Plattsburgh, NY 12901
(518) 564-2000
St Thomas Aquinas College
Art Therapy
125 Route 340
Sparkill, NY 10976
(845) 398-4100

Additional Web Links

For more information on creative arts therapists, go to:

American Art Therapy Association: http://www.arttherapy.org

American Music Therapy Association: http://www.musictherapy.org

National Association for Drama Therapy: http://www.nadt.org

New York Art Therapy Association: http://www.nyarttherapy.org.

National Coalition of Creative Arts Therapies Association: http://www.nccata.org

What Do Dental Assistants Do?

Dental assistants perform a wide array of clinical and administrative duties under the supervision of a dentist. They assist the dentist during dental examinations and treatments, such as preparing the patient, taking x-rays, sterilizing instruments, assisting with instruments and materials, and instructing patients about general and post-operative oral health care. Dental assistants may also have administrative duties, including scheduling appointments, maintaining patient files, and billing for services.

In general, dental assistants’ duties vary by state and by the dentists’ offices where they work. In some states, dental assistants may do additional training and be registered, certified, or called “extended function” dental assistants. The scope of practice for these dental assistants, defined by the state in which they practice, tends to be broader and more complex. In New York, dental assistants have the option to be certified and if so, they have a broader scope of practice than those dental assistants who are not certified. Certified dental assistants in New York are allowed to take preliminary medical histories and vital signs that must be reviewed by the supervising dentist, select and pre-fit provisional crowns and orthodontic bands, take impressions for study casts or diagnostic casts, and remove periodontal dressings.

For more information, visit: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dental-assistants.htm

Where Do Dental Assistants Work?

The majority of dental assistants work in dental offices and clinics, while some work in hospital and doctors’ offices. Most dental assistants work full time.

What Do Dental Assistants Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, dental assistants nationwide was $39,770, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that dental assistants in New York earned an average annual salary of $38,240, (entry level-$26,290, experienced- $44,210).

Supply and Demand

Between 2016 and 2026, the BLS projects the number of dental assistant jobs will increase by 19.5% nationwide and by 22.8% in New York during the same time period. For more information on projections of dental assistants by New York State labor regions, 2014-2026, click here.

New York Education Requirements

In New York, dental assistants who are not certified may be hired into an entry level dental assistant position and receive on-the-job training.

To be a certified dental assistant in New York, an individual must complete a dental assistant education program approved by the New York State Education Department or an alternate course of study that is considered equivalent to an approved program. These programs are typically one year in length and are available at community colleges and local Boards of Cooperative Education (BOCES).

New York Licensure Requirements

In order to be certified as a dental assistant in New York, an individual must be 17 years of age, complete an educational program as described above, and pass a national dental assistant examination administered by the Dental Assisting National Board. For more information: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/dent/dentcdalic.htm

Financial Support

The American Student Dental Association (ASDA) has a list of scholarships available for students. See their website: http://www.asdanet.org/index/dental-student-resources/scholarships-and-repayment-plans/scholarships.

The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) also has scholarship, awards, and fellowship information: See this page on their website.

The American Dental Assisting Association (ADAA) also has a foundation that offers awards. http://www.dentalassistant.org/?page=ADAAFoundation

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Educational Opportunity Center
University at Buffalo,
555 Ellicott St.
Buffalo, NY 14203
(716) 645-9555
Access Careers
474 Fulton Ave
Hempstead, NY 11550
(516) 433-0034
and
1930 Veterans Hwy
Islandia, NY 11749
(631) 630-9410
Hudson Valley Community College
80 Vanderburgh Avenue
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 629-4822
Mandl School
The College of Allied Health
254 W 54th Street
New York, NY 10019
(212) 247-3434
Monroe 2-Orleans BOCES
Rochester Technology Path
160 Wallace Way
Rochester, NY 14624
(585) 349-9100
Monroe Community College
1000 East Henrietta Road
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 292-2000
Nassau BOCES
Barry Career & Technical Educ Center
1196 Prospect Avenue
Westbury, NY 11590
(516) 622-6800
New York School for Medical & Dental Assistants
33-10 Queens Boulevard
Long Island City, NY 11101
(718) 793-2330
Onondaga-Cortland-Madison BOCES
4500 Crown Road
Liverpool, NY 13090
(315) 453-4455
Center for Instruction Tech
& Innovation (Citi)
Oswego County BOCES
179 County Route 64
Mexico, NY 13114
(315) 963-4251
Greater Southern Tier BOCES
Schuyler-Steuben-Chemung-Tioga-Allegany Counties
459 Philo Road
Elmira, NY 14903
(607) 739-3581
Stony Brook University
School of Dental Medicine
South Drive
Stony Brook, NY 11794
(631) 632-8989
St. Paul’s School of Nursing
Corporate Commons Two
2 Teleport Drive
Staten Island, NY 10311
(718) 818-6470
Westchester School for Dental Assistants
242 Central Avenue
White Plains, NY 10606
(914) 682-9001
Cattaraugus-Allegany-Erie-Wyoming BOCES
1825 Windfall Rd
Olean, NY 14760
(716) 376-8200
SUNY Erie Community College
6205 Main Street
Williamsville, NY 14221
(716) 851-1322
Plaza College
118-33 Queens Blvd
Forest Hills, NY 11375
(718) 779-1430
 

Additional Web Links:

The American Dental Assistants Association

The New York State Dental Association

New York State Dental Foundation

What Do Dental Hygienists Do?

Dental hygienists are licensed health professionals who provide preventive dental care, perform oral health assessments and teeth cleanings, apply cavity preventive agents to teeth, take and develop x-rays, and educate patients on proper oral hygiene techniques. In some states, dental hygienists are allowed to place and carve filling materials, place temporary fillings and periodontal dressings, remove sutures, perform root planing, and smooth and polish metal restorations. Under the supervision of dentists, dental hygienists in New York are permitted to administer and monitor local infiltration anesthesia and nitrous oxide.

For more information about dental hygienists, go to: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dental-hygienists.htm.

Where Do Dental Hygienists Work?

Dental hygienists work in dental offices and clinics. Some may also be found in schools; hospitals; nursing homes; community health clinics; and federal, state, and county health departments. More than half of dental hygienists work part time.

What Do Dental Hygienists Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, dental hygienists nationwide was $75,500, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that dental hygienists in New York earned an average annual salary of $78,060, (entry level-$58,110, experienced- $88,040).

Supply and Demand

Growing interest in preventive oral health care is expected to create more demand for dental hygienists. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that between the 2016 and 2026, the number of dental hygienist jobs will increase by 19.7% nationwide and will increase by 22.7% in New York during the same time period.

For more information on projections of dental hygienists by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

New York Educational Program Requirements

Dental hygienist educational programs in New York are usually found at community colleges and sometimes at universities. Most dental hygienist programs in New York and throughout the country offer an associate degree, while some universities offer a four-year bachelor’s degree in dental hygiene.

New York Licensure Requirements

Dental hygienists who practice in New York must be licensed. Requirements include graduating from an accredited dental hygiene education program and passing the written and clinical certification examinations, which are administered from a national organization. Continuing education is also required for active dental hygienists in order to maintain licensure. To administer and monitor local infiltration anesthesia and nitrous oxide analgesia in the practice of dental hygiene, dental hygienists must meet additional requirements and obtain a Dental Hygiene Restricted Local Infiltration Anesthesia/Nitrous Oxide Analgesia Certification.

For more information: www.op.nysed.gov/prof/dent/dentdhlic.htm.

Financial Support

The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) offers scholarships and grants to dental hygiene students and dental hygienists who can demonstrate a commitment to further the discipline of dental hygiene through academic achievement, professional excellence, and a desire to improve the public’s overall health. For more information: http://www.adha.org/scholarships-and-grants.

The American Dental Association (ADA) Foundation offers a variety grants, awards, and scholarships to dental students. For more information, please go to: http://www.adafoundation.org/en/how-to-apply/education/.

The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) also has scholarship, awards, and fellowship information: See this page on their website.

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Broome Community College, SUNY
907 Upper Front St
Binghamton, NY 13902
(607) 778-5000
New York City College of Technology, CUNY
300 Jay Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 260-5000
Erie Community College, SUNY
North Campus
6205 Main Street
Williamsville, NY 14221-7095
(716) 851-1322
Hostos Community College, CUNY
500 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 518-4444
Hudson Valley Community College
80 Vanderburgh Avenue
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 629-4822
Monroe Community College
Brighton Campus
1000 East Henrietta Rd.
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 292-2000
New York University
College of Dentistry
345 East 24th Street
New York, NY 10010
(212) 998-9800
SUNY Orange 
115 South Street
Middletown, NY 10940
(845) 341-4306
Farmingdale State College, SUNY
2350 Broadhollow Road
Farmingdale, NY 11735
(631) 420-2000
Plaza College
(waiting for CODA accreditation-Apr 2019)
118-33 Queens Blvd
Forest Hills, NY  11375
(718) 779-1430

Additional Web Links

For more information on Dental Hygienists, go to:

American Dental Hygienists Association: http://www.adha.org/

New York State Dental Hygienists Association: http://www.dhasny.org/.

What Do Dentists Do?

Dentists diagnose and treat problems with teeth and tissues in the mouth, along with giving advice and administering care to help prevent future dental problems. They provide oral health education and instruction on diet, brushing, flossing, and the use of fluorides. They remove tooth decay, fill cavities, examine x-rays, place protective sealants on children’s teeth, straighten teeth, extract or repair damaged teeth, and perform corrective surgery on gums and supporting bones to treat gum diseases.

Dentists also prescribe medication, such as antibiotics, and administer anesthesia.

While most dentists are general practitioners, some choose to specialize. Dental specialties include:

  • orthodontics (treatment of abnormalities in teeth and jaws using devices such as braces and retainers);
  • oral and maxillofacial surgery (surgical procedures on jaws or mouth);
  • pediatric dentistry (oral health care for children and adolescents);
  • periodontics (treatment of disease of the gums and bones which support the teeth); and
  • public health dentistry (promoting oral health through organized community efforts).

Dentists usually employ and work with dental hygienists and dental assistants.

For more information: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dentists.htm.

Where Do Dentists Work?

The vast majority of dentists work in private group or solo practices. Some may also work in dental clinics, hospitals, or in academic settings.

What Do Dentists Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, dentists nationwide was $175,840, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that dentists in New York earned an average annual salary of $170,730, (entry level-$111,300, experienced- $200,440).

Earnings for dentists vary according to number of years in practice, location, hours worked, and specialty. Specialty dentists generally earn more than general dentists. Also, self-employed dentists in private practice tend to earn more than salaried dentists. Dentists who are salaried often receive benefits paid by their employer, with health insurance and malpractice insurance being among the most common. However, like other business owners, self-employed dentists must provide their own health insurance, life insurance, retirement plans, and other benefits and pay for their own business expenses, such as supplies, equipment, malpractice, and staff.

Supply and Demand

According to the BLS, between 2016 and 2026, the number of general dentist jobs nationwide is projected to increase by 19.4%, and in New York by 22.2% during the same time period. The number of specialty dentist jobs nationwide is projected to increase by 13.3%, slightly lower than the 17.8% increase in New York for the same time period. The demand for dental care in New York and around the country is expected to increase as the population ages.

For more information on projections by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

Educational Requirements

Dental education programs are four years in length and generally include two years of classroom and laboratory instruction and two years of practical clinical experience, usually through supervised direct patient care. A growing number of dental school graduates are choosing to enter one- or two-year residency training programs.

Individuals interested in a career in dentistry must complete at least 60 credit hours of college study and usually have a bachelor’s degree. They are encouraged to take courses in biology, chemistry, anatomy, microbiology, and physics as an undergraduate. Students interested in attending dental school must take the Dental Admission Test.

New York Licensure Requirements

Dentists who practice in New York must be licensed and requirements include graduating from an accredited dental education program and passing the National Board Dental Examination. Continuing education is also required for active dentists to maintain licensure. Dentists can also get a certificate to administer general anesthesia, parenteral conscious sedation, or enteral conscious sedation. For more information: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/dent/dentlic.htm.

Financial Support

The American Dental Association Foundation offers a variety grants, awards, and scholarships to dental students. For more information, please go to: http://www.adafoundation.org/en/how-to-apply/education/.

The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) also has scholarship, awards, and fellowship information: See this page on their website.

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Columbia University
College of Dental Medicine
630 West 168th Street
New York, NY 10032
(212) 305-3478
New York University
College of Dentistry
345 East 24th street
New York, NY 10010
(212) 998-9800
Stony Brook University
School of Dental Medicine
100 Nicolls Rd
Stony Brook, NY 11794
(631) 632-6000
University at Buffalo
School of Dental Medicine
315 Squire Hall
Buffalo, NY 14214
(716) 829-2839

Additional Web Links

For more information on dentists, go to the American Dental Association website at: http://www.ada.org/; or the New York State Dental Association at: http://www.nysdental.org/.

 

What Do Diagnostic Medical Sonographers Do?

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (DMSs), also known as ultrasonographers or sonographers, use special equipment that directs high frequency sound waves into a patient’s body to collect images for interpretation by physicians to assess and diagnose various medical conditions (procedures commonly known as ultrasounds, sonograms, or echocardiograms).

This diagnostic medical procedure can be used to examine the abdomen, breasts, female reproductive system, prostate, heart, and blood vessels. Sonography is increasingly being used in the detection and treatment of heart disease, heart attack, and vascular disease that can lead to strokes. Specialization in gynecologic sonography, abdominal sonography, neurosonography, and ophthalmologic sonography is common in the profession.

Unlike x-rays, sonography is a radiation-free imaging modality. Although most ultrasound procedures are non-invasive, invasive ultrasound procedures are becoming more frequently used with the development of new technology.

For more information about DMSs, click here.

Where Do Diagnostic Medical Sonographers Work?

The majority of all DMSs are employed in hospitals. Some DMSs work in physicians’ offices and clinics, particularly diagnostic imaging centers and offices specializing in obstetrics. DMSs are also employed in medical and dental laboratories. Also, some DMSs work in federal or local government and offices of non-physician health practitioners and allied health professionals.

What Do Diagnostic Medical Sonographers Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, diagnostic medical sonographers nationwide was $73,860, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that diagnostic medical sonographers in New York earned an average annual salary of $75,640, (entry level-$60,630, experienced- $83,140).

Supply and Demand

As ultrasound technology evolves, it will become a more and more common method used to assist in diagnosing medical conditions, favored over more invasive procedures. As a result, the number of DMS jobs is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations. Between 2016 and 2026, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the total number of DMS jobs nationwide will increase by 23.2%, and in New York will increase to 26.9%.

For more information on the need for DMSs by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

Educational Requirements

DMSs usually have an associate degree or a four-year bachelor’s degree and programs are available through colleges and universities. Some sonographers train in vocational-technical schools, hospital training programs, or the Armed Forces. Many employers prefer a degree or certificate from an accredited institute or hospital program. The accredited programs usually follow a specific course of study and include clinical training. Course work may include classes in anatomy, physiology, instrumentation, basic physics, mathematics, patient care, and medical ethics. These programs also include courses in medical terminology and interpreting sonographic images.

New York does not require DMSs to be licensed. Individuals wishing to demonstrate proficiency in their occupation may receive certification through national organizations such as the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (ARDMS), http://www.ardms.org. ARDMS certification is also available in specialty areas within sonography.

Financial Support

Although specialized scholarships for diagnostic medical sonographers are not widely available, students seeking an education in sonography can apply for financial aid through a number of state and Federal aid programs.  More information about student aid is available at: www.highered.nysed.gov/NYLearns/finances.htm.

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Hudson Valley Community College
80 Vanderburgh Avenue
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 629-4822
Long Island University
Brooklyn Campus
1 University Plaza
Brooklyn, New York 11201
(718) 488-1011
Rochester Institute of Technology
One Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 475-2411
SUNY Downstate
College of Health Related Professions
450 Clarkson Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 270-1000
Western Suffolk BOCES
152 Laurel Hill Rd
Northport, NY 11768
(631) 261-3600
Trocaire College
360 Choate Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14220
(716) 826-1200
SUNY Upstate Medical University
College of Health Professions
750 East Adams St
Syracuse, NY 13210
(315) 464-5540
Hunter Business School
Suffolk Campus
3247 Route 112
Medford, NY 11763
(631) 736-7360
Center for Allied Health Education
1401 Kings Highway
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 645-3500
Alfred State College of Tech
10 Upper College Dr
Alfred, NY  14802
(800) 425-3733
NY Medical Career Training Center
36-09 Main Street
Flushing, NY 11354
(718)460-1717
The CURE Center
for Ultrasound Research & Education
333 Westchester Ave
White Plains, NY 10604
(855) 843-2873

Additional Web Links

For more information on medical sonographers, go to the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography website at: http://www.sdms.org/.

What Do Dialysis Technicians Do?

Dialysis technicians operate dialysis machines that help sustain patients who have damaged kidneys. The machines remove waste and excess fluids from the blood of patients whose kidneys can no longer carry out those functions. Dialysis patients generally use a dialysis machine for about four hours, three times a week.

Dialysis technicians are also referred to as renal dialysis technicians, hemodialysis technicians, and nephrology technicians. These technicians prepare patients for dialysis, monitor them and the machine during dialysis, and perform required procedures when dialysis is completed. Dialysis technicians also carefully monitor and record the weight and vital signs of patients before, during, and after the blood cleansing procedures. In addition, dialysis technicians may instruct patients about in-home treatments.

Where Do Dialysis Technicians Work?

Dialysis technicians work under the supervision of registered nurses and physicians and are employed in dialysis facilities located in hospitals, out-patient facilities, assisted living and nursing homes, and home dialysis programs. Technicians generally work around 40 hours a week.

What Do Dialysis Technicians Earn?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not yet publish employment and earnings data for dialysis technicians. According to salary.com, the average Renal Dialysis Technician salary in the United States is $39,649 in 2019, slightly lower than the average salary of $41,343 in New York State.

Salary ranges can vary widely depending on the city and many other important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

Supply and Demand

According to the National Kidney Foundation, more than 26 million American adults have kidney disease and millions of others are at increased risk. High risk groups include those with diabetes, hypertension, and family history of kidney disease. Early detection and treatment can often keep chronic kidney disease from getting worse. When kidney disease progresses, it may eventually lead to kidney failure, which requires dialysis or a kidney transplant to maintain life.

A trend toward replacing nephrology nurses with dialysis technicians wherever possible will increase the number of jobs available for dialysis technicians. In addition, as treatments for kidney disease improve, patients live longer and consequently require dialysis for longer periods of time. All these factors point to a strong job market for dialysis technicians.

Educational/Licensure Requirements

Dialysis technicians must have a high school diploma or GED certificate and then must complete an approved training program. Many of these programs are available through technical and vocational schools and community colleges as part of an associate degree in nephrology or medical technology.

New York does not require licensure for dialysis technicians, however the state requires the completion of a state-approved program from a state college, vocational school, or a health care provider. Such programs generally educate dialysis technicians regarding first aid, safety skills, hygiene, and dialysis equipment maintenance.

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Dialysis 4 Career
50 Clinton Street, Suite 606
Hempstead, NY 11550
(516) 292-2966
NY Medical Career Training Center
50 36-09 Main Street 5th Floor
Flushing NY 11354
(718)-460-1717
New Age Training
145 West 30th Street
New York, NY 10001
(212) 947-7940
The Manhattan Institute
45 West 34th Street
New York, NY 10001
(347) 220-8181

Additional Web Links

For more information on dialysis technicians, go to

The American Society of Nephrology: http://www.asn-online.org/

The Board of Nephrology Examiners Nursing and Technology (BONENT): http://www.bonent.org/

National Nephrology Certification Organization: http://www.nnco-cert.org/

The National Kidney Foundation: http://www.kidney.org/

What Do Dietitians and Nutritionists Do?

Dietitians and nutritionists are experts in food and nutrition. They advise people on what to eat in order to lead a healthy lifestyle or achieve specific health-related goals.

Dietitians and nutritionists try to prevent health problems and aim to treat health problems by helping people develop better eating habits. They often work with patients who have heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, eating disorders, or are overweight. They may plan diet programs, conduct nutritional assessments, direct menu development, manage food service systems, supervise meal preparations, and provide nutritional counseling.
For more details, go to: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dietitians-and-nutritionists.htm.

Where Do Dietitians and Nutritionists Work?

Dietitians and nutritionists may work as clinicians, managers, researchers, or consultants and are found in a variety of settings. Over half work in hospitals and nursing homes, while others work in health clinics, home health agencies, doctors’ offices, schools, health clubs, cafeterias, and private practices.

What Do Dietitians and Nutritionists Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, dietitians and nutritionists nationwide was $61,210, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that dieticians and nutritionists in New York earned an average annual salary of $67,510, (entry level-$50,780, experienced- $75,870).

Supply and Demand

The number of dietitians and nutritionists nationwide is projected to increase more than 14.6% between 2016 and 2026, and more than 21.3% in New York in the same time period.

This increase is attributable in part to the increasing awareness of the relationship between diet and health and the importance of diet in preventing and treating illnesses and the role of food in promoting health and wellness. The importance of diet in preventing and treating illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease is now well known, and more dietitians and nutritionists will be needed to provide care for people with these conditions. An aging population also will increase the need for dietitians and nutritionists in nursing homes. Job opportunities are also expected to increase in community health centers, physicians’ offices, and home health agencies. An increasing number of dietitians and nutritionists are expected to be self-employed. Fewer new jobs are expected at hospitals.

For more information on employment projections of dietitians and nutritionists by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

New York Education and Licensure Requirements

Dietitians and nutritionists in New York and nationally usually have at least a bachelor’s degree. In New York, it is possible to be certified as a dietitian and nutritionist with an associate degree from an accredited educational program and more time in an approved work experience. However, most New York educational programs offer bachelor’s or advanced degrees. All accredited dietitian and nutritionist education programs include coursework in professional dietetics and nutrition as well as human biology and behavioral science. For more information, go to: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/diet/.

Dieticians and nutritionists who practice in New York must be certified by one of the two national certifying organizations. Requirements include graduating from an accredited educational program and completing an approved work experience. For more information, go to: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/diet/dietlic.htm.

Recertification every five years by one of the two national certifying organizations requires the completion of a specific number of continuing education credits.

Financial Support

The American Dietetic Association offers scholarships and financial aid to students studying to become dietitians and nutritionists. For more information, go to: https://eatrightfoundation.org/why-it-matters/awards/ and https://www.eatrightpro.org/membership/student-member-center/scholarships-and-financial-aid

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Westchester Community College
75 Grasslands Road
Valhalla, NY 10595
(914) 606-6600
Brooklyn College
2900 Bedford Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11210
(718) 951-5000
Buffalo State – SUNY
1300 Elmwood Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14222
(716) 878-4000
Columbia University
Teacher’s College

525 West 120th St
New York, NY 10027-6696
(212) 678-3950
Cornell University
410 Thurston Avenue
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-2247
D’Youville College
320 Porter Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14202
(716) 829-8000
Hunter College
695 Park Ave
NY, NY 10065
(212) 772-4000
Lehman College – CUNY
250 Bedford Park Blvd. West
Bronx, NY 10468
(718) 960-8000
Long Island University
C.W. Post Campus
720 Northern Boulevard
Brookville, NY 11548
(516) 299-2000
LaGuardia Community College -CUNY 
31-10 Thomson Ave
Long Island City, NY 11101-3007
(718) 482-5973 or (718) 482-5740
New York University
Steinhardt Dept of Nutrition & Food Studies
411 Lafayette Street
New York, NY 10003
(212) 998-5580
The Sage Colleges
65 1st Street
Troy, NY 12180
and
140 New Scotland Ave
Albany, NY 12208
(518) 244-2000
Rochester Institute of Technology
College of Health Sciences and Technology
One Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 475-2411
SUNY Oneonta
Also have online MS Degree
108 Ravine Parkway
Oneonta, NY 13820
(607) 436-3500
Plattsburgh- SUNY
101 Broad Street
Plattsburgh, NY 12901
(518) 564-2000
Syracuse University
900 South Crouse Ave
Syracuse, NY 13244
(315) 443-1870
Queens College- CUNY
65-30 Kissena Blvd.
Flushing, NY 11367
(718) 997-5000
New York Chiropractic College
School of Health Sciences & Education
2360 State Rte 89
Seneca Falls, NY 13148
(800) 234-6922
Bronx Community College
2155 University Ave
Bronx, NY  10453
(718) 289-5100
SUNY Morrisville
80 Eaton St
Morrisville, NY 13408
(315) 684-6000
Stony Brook University
101 Nicolls Rd
Stony Brook, NY  11794
(631) 689-8333
Nassau Community College
One Education Dr
Garden City, NY  11530
(516) 572-7501
Adelphi University 
1 South Ave
Garden City, NY 11530
(800) 233-5744
Niagara County Community College
3111 Saunders Settlement Rd
Sanborn, NY 14132
(716) 614-6222
NY Institute of Technology (NYIT) 
Online only
(800) 345-6948
University at Buffalo
12 Capen Hall
Buffalo, NY 14260
(716) 646-2000
Canisius 
2001 Main St
Buffalo, NY 14208
(718) 883-7000
Schenectady County Community College
78 Washington Ave
Schenectady, NY 12305
(518) 381-1200
   

Additional Web Links

The Commission on Dietetic Registration: http://www.cdrnet.org/

The Certification Board for Nutrition Specialists: http://cbns.org/

What Do EMTs and Paramedics Do?

Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics (EMTs with advanced training to perform more difficult pre-hospital medical procedures) provide vital care and attention at the scene of an emergency. In an emergency, EMTs and paramedics are dispatched to the scene usually by a 911 operator and often work with police and fire department personnel. Once they arrive, they determine the nature and extent of a person’s condition and administer appropriate level of care.

People’s lives often depend on the quick reactions of and competent care by EMTs and paramedics. EMTs and paramedics respond to emergency calls, assess injuries, sometimes free trapped individuals or remove them from danger, and administer emergency medical care. They also transport injured or sick persons to medical facilities, typically providing additional medical care in route.

At a medical facility, EMTs and paramedics help transfer patients to the emergency department, report their observations and actions to emergency room staff, and may provide additional emergency treatment as needed. For more information, go to: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/emts-and-paramedics.htm#tab-1.

Beyond these general duties, the specific responsibilities of EMTs and paramedics depend on their qualification and training. The levels of training include:

  • Certified First Responders
  • Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs)
  • Advanced EMTs (AEMTs)

Certified First Responders are trained to perform patient assessments and give basic emergency medical care and provide necessary life-saving treatment until an ambulance arrives with more highly trained personnel. Many firefighters, police officers, and other first responders have this level of training.

 EMTs are trained to care for patients at the scene of an accident and while transporting patients by ambulance to the hospital. EMTs have the emergency skills to assess a patient’s condition and manage respiratory, cardiac, and trauma emergencies.

AEMTs receive additional training to administer emergency medical care providing advanced life support care involving skills-management techniques (i.e., advanced airway management), administration of intravenous fluids, Electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring and interpretation, medication administration, manual defibrillation, and transportation to a hospital. In New York, there are three levels of AEMTs: Intermediate, Critical Care, and Paramedic.

Paramedics provide the most extensive pre-hospital care. In addition to carrying out all the procedures described above, paramedics are responsible for stabilizing patients during a medical emergency, preparing them for transfer to a hospital, if necessary, and for providing medical care in route to a hospital. Paramedics may administer drugs (including narcotics) orally and intravenously, interpret ECGs, perform tracheotomies, and use various monitors and other complex equipment.

Where Do EMTs and Paramedics Work?

EMTs and paramedics work from ambulances and other emergency vehicles, and indoors and outdoors in an array of settings and in all types of weather. Their work is physically strenuous and can be stressful, sometimes involving life-or-death situations and patients who are suffering.

Most EMTs and paramedics work full time. Because EMTs and paramedics must be available to work during emergencies, they may work overnight, on weekends, and/or remain on call for extended periods of time. Some EMTs and paramedics are volunteers and have varied work schedules.

What Do EMTs and Paramedics Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, EMTs and paramedics nationwide was $37,760, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that EMTs and Paramedics in New York earned an average annual salary of $42,580, (entry level-$28,290, experienced- $49,730).

Supply and Demand

Between 2016 and 2026, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the total number of EMTs and paramedics jobs nationwide will increase by 15.1%, and by 23.4% in New York.

As population and urbanization increase, emergencies such as car crashes, natural disasters, and violence will continue to create demand for EMTs and paramedics. There will also continue to be demand for part-time, volunteer EMTs and paramedics in rural areas and smaller metropolitan areas.

Growth in the middle-age and elderly population from the large cohort of aging baby boomers will likely lead to an increase in the number of age-related health emergencies, such as heart attacks or strokes. The potential for more of these types of medical emergencies also points to continued growing demand for EMTs and paramedics.

For more information on the need for EMTs and paramedics by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

New York Education and Certification Requirements

EMTs are certified by the Bureau of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in New York, which is a part of the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH). There is a reciprocity certification process for those trained in other states or through the military. To be a certified as a certified first responder, you must be 16 by the end of the month the exam is taken. To be a certified as an EMT or AEMT, you must be 18 by the end of the month the exam is taken.

Formal training and certification is required through course sponsors approved by NYSDOH. More advanced types of EMTs, namely paramedics, complete more training. Some programs may offer an associate degree along with the formal EMT training. Advanced placement is available for health care professionals based on the individual’s level of training and the ability to test out of specific training requirements.

To learn about training for

  • Certified First Responder (CFR)
  • Emergency Medical Technician – Basic (EMT-B)
  • Advanced Emergency Medical Technician – Intermediate (AEMT-I)
  • Advanced Emergency Medical Technician – Critical Care (AEMT-CC)
  • Advanced Emergency Medical Technician – Paramedic (AEMT-P)

in your community, each Regional EMS Council receives notification of upcoming course. The Regional Council should be your first contact to determine what courses are planned for your area. Only Bureau of EMS approved Course Sponsors, click here; are allowed to teach the New York State Bureau of EMS certification courses.

Candidates for EMT and paramedic certification in New York must pass both written and skills performance state examinations from an approved New York State program. To maintain certification in New York, EMTs and paramedics must reregister every three years. For more information on the certification process, please visit: http://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/ems/

Education Programs in New York

For more information about EMT and paramedic education and training programs and courses in New York, go to: http://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/ems/training.htm

Center for Allied Health Education
1401 Kings Highway
Brooklyn, NY 11229
(718) 645-3500
Erie Community College- SUNY
4041 Southwestern Blvd
Orchard Park, NY  14127
(716) 851-1322
Borough of Manhattan Community College
199 Chambers St
New York, NY  10007
(212) 220-8000
Hudson Valley Community College
80 Vandenburgh Ave
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 629-4822
Dutchess Community College
Hollowbrook Park, Bldg #4
31 Marshall Rd
Wappingers Falls, NY 12590
(845) 790-3610
LaGuardia Community College
31-10 Thomson Ave
Long Island City, 11101
(718) 482-7200
Kingsborough Community College
2001 Oriental Blvd
Brooklyn, NY 11235
(718)368-5000
SUNY Broome
907 Upper Front Street
Binghamton, NY 13905
(607) 778-5000
Westchester Community College
75 Grasslands Rd
Valhalla, NY 10595
(914) 606-6600
SUNY Cobleskill
106 Suffolk Circle
Cobleskill, NY 12043
(518) 255-5011
Finger Lakes Community College
Geneva Campus Center
63 Pulteney St
Geneva, NY 14456
(315) 789-6701
Herkimer College-SUNY
100 Reservoir Rd
Herkimer, NY 13350
(315)866-0300
Monroe Community College
1000 East Henrietta Rd
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 292-2000
Suffolk County Community College
533 College Rd
Seldon, NY 11784
(631) 451-4000

Additional Web Links

For more information on EMTs and paramedics, go to:

National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians: http://www.naemt.org/

National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians: https://www.nremt.org/rwd/public/

Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the EMS professions: http://www.coaemsp.org/

What Do Environmental Health Workers Do?

Environmental health workers are responsible for carrying out measures for protecting public health, including administering and enforcing legislation related to environmental health and providing support to minimize health and safety hazards.

Common duties of environmental health workers include collecting samples of water, soil, waste and animal matter; transporting and documenting samples; verifying code and regulatory compliance; investigating complaints; preparing and maintaining records; and other duties as needed.

Where Do Environmental Health Workers Work?

Environmental health workers are usually employed by local government or state health authorities to advise on and enforce public health standards. However, many are employed in the private sector, the military, and other third sector agencies such as charities and NGOs.

What Do Environmental Health Workers Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, environmental science and protection technicians (environmental health workers) nationwide was $50,350, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that environmental science and protection technicians in New York earned an average annual salary of $50,540, (entry level-$31,860, experienced- $59,880).

Supply and Demand

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and its Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program place Environmental Health Workers in the occupational category of “Environmental Science and Protection Technicians, Including Health” will increase 12.1% in the U.S. and by 22.0% in New York during the same time period.

For more information on projections of environmental health workers by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

New York Educational/Licensure Requirements

The educational requirements for environmental health workers vary. Environmental health workers working in government agencies may have more stringent requirements than those working in other locations. Most environmental science and protection technicians need an associate degree or two years of postsecondary training. Sometimes new technicians are trained on the job by more experienced environmental science and protection technicians. Higher level environmental health workers, such as environmental engineers and scientists need a bachelor’s degree with a substantial number of college credits in the sciences. The types of science courses required may differ depending on the specific area of interest or concentration. Master’s or doctoral degrees are available in environmental health, engineering, and science.

New York does not require licensure for environmental health workers.

Financial Support

In addition to scholarships offered at different schools, scholarships for environmental health workers are available from the National Environmental Health Association: http://www.neha.org/students/index.html.

Educational Programs in New York (subject to change)

Columbia University
Mailman School of Public Health
722 West 168th Street
New York, NY 10032-0403
(212) 305-3464 or (212) 305-3466
New York Medical College
School of Health Sciences and Practice
40 Sunshine Cottage Rd
Valhalla, NY 10595
(914) 594-4000
Rochester Institute of Technology
College of Applied Science and Technology
One Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623-5603
(585) 475-2411
University at Albany-SUNY
School of Public Health
1 University Place
Rensselaer, NY 12144
(518) 402-0283
University at Buffalo- SUNY
401 Kimball Tower
Buffalo, NY 14260
(716) 829-5000
SUNY Downstate Medical Center
School of Public Health
450 Clarkson Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11203
(718) 270-1065
CUNY Graduate School of Public Health
55 W 125th St
New York, NY 10027
(646) 364-9600
 

Additional Web Links

For more information about environmental health workers, please visit these websites:

American Academy of Environmental Engineers and Scientists: http://www.aaees.org/

American Academy of Sanitarians: www.sanitarians.org

American Public Health Association: www.apha.org

Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors: http://www.aeesp.org/

National Environmental Health Association: www.neha.org

New York State Public Health Association: http://nyspha.roundtablelive.org/

Public Health Association of New York City: http://www.phanyc.org/

Public Health Online:  www.publichealthonline.org/careers.

What Do Health Care Administrators and Medical and Health Services Managers Do?

While healthcare administrators and healthcare managers share similar responsibilities, they do perform different tasks. Healthcare administrators oversee the staff of a medical facility. They may supervise and manage one department or the whole facility depending on the need and availability of administrators. Responsible for staffing and financial aspects of the medical facility in which they work, healthcare administrators help a facility run smoothly with constantly changing healthcare regulations and cutbacks.

Healthcare managers take on a broader role within a medical facility. Often acting in a similar capacity to a corporation’s HR representative, healthcare managers deal with daily operations such as budgeting, patient care, organizational issues and general business concerns. They may work directly with a hospital board to find ways of better managing the hospital’s structure or provide a plan of action in times of crisis. In smaller facilities, they could take on a larger role to fulfill HR requirements.

The bottom line is that there is a difference between the two career paths: Healthcare administrators focus on managing staff needs, and healthcare managers focus on the broader business aspects of a medical facility. Examples of medical and health services managers include health information managers, assistant administrators, clinical managers, and nursing home administrators.

For more information on medical and health services managers click here.

Where Do Health Care Administrators and Medical and Health Service’s Manager’s Work?

About one third of medical and health services managers work in state, local, and private hospitals. Others work in nursing and residential care facilities, offices of physicians, and government and home healthcare services. Most medical and health services managers work in offices located at hospitals, nursing homes, and group medical practices.

Health care administrators work in a variety of health care settings, including hospitals, clinics, offices of physicians and group medical practices, nursing homes, and home health care agencies. Some work also may work outside of health care in government or community-based organizations.

What Do Health Care Administrators and Medical and Health Service’s Manager’s Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, health care administrators and medical and health service managers nationwide was $113,730, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that health care administrators and medical and health service managers in New York earned an average annual salary of $139,590, (entry level-$81,510, experienced- $168,630).

Supply and Demand

Between 2016 and 2026, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 20.5% increase of jobs for medical and health services managers nationwide and a 22.3% increase in New York during the same time period.

The health care industry continues to expand and diversify, requiring managers and administrators to help ensure smooth business operations and improve quality and efficiency of health care, while controlling costs. Additional demand for medical and health services managers will stem from the need to recruit workers and increase employee retention; comply with changing health care policies and regulations; implement new technologies, such as computerization of patient records; and help improve health services for patients and medical staff by emphasizing preventive care.

For more information on the need for health care administrators and health services managers by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

Educational Requirements

Most medical and health services managers have at least a bachelor’s degree, however master’s degrees are becoming more preferred by employers. Some graduate programs offer an additional year of supervised administrative experience in a hospital or healthcare setting.

Common degrees for medical and health services managers include health administration, health management, nursing, public health administration, or business administration.  Important qualities required of medical and health services managers include analytical and communication skills, detail oriented, interpersonal skills, leadership skills, and technical skills.

Medical and health services managers advance by moving into higher paying positions with more responsibility. Some health information managers can become responsible for the entire hospital’s information systems, while others may advance to top executive positions within the organization.

Most health care administrators have at least a bachelor’s degree before entering the field, and many have a master’s degree in health services administration, long-term care administration, health sciences, public health, public administration, or business administration. A bachelor’s degree is adequate for some entry-level positions in smaller facilities, at the departmental level within health care organizations, and in health information management. Coursework in health administration programs will include topics such as hospital organization and management, marketing, accounting and budgeting, human resources administration, strategic planning, law and ethics, biostatistics or epidemiology, health economics, and health information systems.

New York Licensure Requirements

New York does not require licensure for most health care administrators except for nursing home administrators, who must work closely with state regulatory agencies. For more information go to: https://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/nursing_home_administrator/licensure_program/ .

Individuals wishing to demonstrate proficiency in the profession may receive certification through national organizations such as the American Association of Healthcare Administration Management: www.aaham.org/Certification/tabid/56/Default.aspx.

Some medical and health services managers choose to become certified through one of the many areas of practice certification is available. The Professional Association of Health Care Office Management, the American Health Information Management Association, and the American College of Health Care Administrators.

Financial Support

The Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) provides student financial support, scholarships, fellowships, and postgraduate learning opportunities, and promotes diversity in the classroom and the field. For more information, please visit the AUPHA Web site: http://www.aupha.org/resourcecenter/currentstudents.

Additional financial assistance through scholarships can be found here.

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Ithaca College
953 Danby Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 274-3011
Adelphi University
1 South Ave.
Garden City, NY 11530
(800) 233-5744
DeVry University
Manhattan Campus
180 Madison Ave Ste 900
New York, NY 10016
(212) 312-4300Rego Park (Queens) Campus
99-21 Queens Blvd
Rego Park, NY 11374
(718) 575-7100
Mercy College
Bronx Campus
1200 Waters Place
Bronx, NY 10461
(877) MERCY-GO
Dobbs Ferry Campus
555 Broadway NY 10522
(914) 674-7600
New York City College of Technology
300 Jay St.
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 260-5000
Roberts Wesleyan College
2301 Westside Dr.
Rochester, NY 14624
1 (800) 777-4792
Baruch College
Zicklin School of Business
55 Lexington Ave at 24th St
New York, NY 10010
(646) 312-1000
Columbia University
Mailman School of Public Health
722 West 168th St, Ste 1014
New York, NY 10032
(212) 342-5127
Cornell University
116 Reservoir Ave
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 254-6461
Hofstra University
126 Hofstra Dome
Hempstead, NY 11549
(516) 463-6600
New York University – Wagner
295 Lafayette Street
New York, NY 10012
(212) 998-7400
Clarkson University/
Union College Capital Region Campus
80 Nott Terrace
Schenectady, NY 12308
(518) 631-9831
University of Rochester
Simon Business School
245 Gleason Hall
Rochester, NY 14627
(585) 275-3439
SUNY Canton
34 Cornell Drive
Canton, NY 13617
(315) 386-7011
D’Youville College
320 Porter Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14201
(716) 829-8000
Rochester Institute of Technology
One Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 475-2411
College at Brockport, SUNY
350 New Campus Drive
Brockport, NY 14420
(585) 395-2211
Utica College
1600 Burrstone Road
Utica, NY 13502
(866) 295-3106
The Sage Colleges
140 New Scotland Ave.
Albany, NY 12208
(518) 244-2000
Stony Brook University
101 Nicolls Rd
Health Sciences Center,
Stony Brook NY 11794
(631) 444-2252
Syracuse University
Maxwell School
219 Maxwell Hall
Syracuse, NY 13244
(315) 443 3759
 

Additional Web Links

For more information on the field of health care administration, go to the American Association of Health Care Administrative Management website at: http://www.aaham.org/.

What Do Health Educators Do?

Health educators teach people about behaviors that promote wellness and encourage people to make healthy decisions. Health educators promote and improve individuals’ and community health by identifying disease risk behaviors and developing programs that help people adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. Program development may include collecting and analyzing data to determine the scope of problems and the community needs prior to planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating programs and campaigns designed to encourage healthy lifestyles, policies, and environments. Health educators also serve as a resource to assist other health care professionals and organizations in program development and implementation.

To learn more about health educators, please go to: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/community-and-social-service/health-educators.htm

Where Do Health Educators Work?

Health educators often work for local, state, or federal government agencies. Many others work in hospitals, schools, colleges, workplaces, public health settings, individual and family services agencies, and outpatient care centers.

What Do Health Educators Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, health educators nationwide was $59,660, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that health educators in New York earned an average annual salary of $57,640, (entry level-$36,960, experienced- $67,980).

Supply and Demand

Between 2016 and 2026, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the total number of health educator jobs in New York will increase by 24.0%, and by 14.5% nationwide.

For more information on the need for the health educators by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

Educational Requirements

Health educators need a bachelor’s degree for entry-level positions. Most health educators hold master’s degrees. There are some formal programs in health education, but many health educators graduate from educational programs in nursing, public health, or related fields. Some employers may require the certified health education specialist credential (see below).

New York Licensure Requirements

New York does not license health educators. Special certification is available for a certified health education specialist (CHES) from the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC). A CHES must get recertified every five years based on documentation of participation in 75 hours of approved continuing education activities, with 45 of these credits from preapproved designated providers and the remaining 30 credits from other providers. For more information on the certification exam and process, click here.

Financial Support

The Association of School of Public Health manages several regular internship and fellowship programs throughout the year. For more information go to: https://www.aspph.org/study/financing-your-degree/.

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy-  CUNY 
55 W 125th St
New York, NY 10021
(646) 364-9600
York College- CUNY
94-20 Guy R Brewer Blvd
Jamaica, NY  11451
(718) 262-2000
Hofstra University
School of Education
125 Health Dome
900 Fulton Avenue
Hempstead, NY 11550
(516) 463-6673
Teachers College-Columbia University
525 West 120th Street
New York, NY 10027-6696
(212) 678-6607
New York Medical College
School of Health Sciences and Practice

Valhalla, NY 10595
(914) 594-4000
 
 Buffalo State- SUNY
1300 Elmwood Ave
Buffalo, NY 14222
(716) 878-5913
SUNY Cortland
Moffett Center,
P.O. Box 2000
Cortland, NY 13045-0900
(607) 753-4225
Ithaca College
School of Health Sciences and Human Performance
953 Danby Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 274-3237
Lehman College
City University of New York Department of Health Sciences
250 Bedford Park Boulevard West
Bronx, NY 10468
(718) 960-8000

Additional Web Links

For more information on health educators, go to

Association of Schools & Programs of Public Health: http://www.aspph.org/

Society of Public Health Education: http://www.sophe.org/

American Public Health Association: www.apha.org

What Do Home Health Aides Do?

Home health aides work in the homes of people who need assistance in caring for themselves. They often help people who are disabled, chronically ill, or cognitively impaired. They also help older adults who may need assistance or people recovering from an illness who may live alone or need more assistance than their families can provide. Home health aides usually work under the supervision of a registered nurse or other health care practitioner to provide basic patient care. Home health aides may take and record a patient’s temperature, pulse, and blood pressure; assist patients with activities of daily living, such as feeding, bathing, dressing, and toileting; help patients to get in and out of bed; and assist with nursing procedures. Home health aides may also observe and report on patients’ physical, mental, and emotional states to their supervisor. In addition, they may assist with shopping, meal preparation, and housekeeping. Although their work can be physically and emotionally demanding, many home health aides gain great satisfaction from assisting those in need.

For more information: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/home-health-aides.htm

Where Do Home Health Aides Work?

Home health aides are usually employed by home health agencies and work in patients’ homes. Home health aides often visit multiple patients on the same day. Some home health aides work in small group homes or larger care communities.

Most full-time aides work about 40 hours per week, but because patients need care 24 hours a day, some aides may work evenings, nights, weekends, and holidays.

What Do Home Health Aides Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, health home aides nationwide was $25,330, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that health home aides in New York earned an average annual salary of $25,430, (entry level-$23,080, experienced- $26,600).

Supply and Demand

For the decade between 2016 and 2026, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 47.3% rise nationwide in the number of Home Health Aides positions, and a 52.4% increase in the number of Home Health Aide positions in New York during the same time period.

Demand for Home Health Aides is growing significantly, attributable in part to the aging of the country’s population. Elderly and disabled clients increasingly rely on home care as a less expensive alternative to nursing homes or hospitals. Clients who need help with everyday tasks and household chores, rather than medical care, can reduce their medical expenses by living in their homes and receiving medical care from a Home Health Aide. Another reason for a high demand for home care is that most clients prefer to be cared for in their homes where they are most comfortable. Studies have found that home treatment is often more effective than care in a nursing home or hospital, prolonging life, and increasing quality of life.

For more information on projections of home health aides by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, please click here.

New York Education and Licensure Requirements

Most home health and personal care aide have a high school diploma. Home health aides in New York must complete a 75-hour Department of Health training program. These training programs are available in a variety of settings, including high schools typically working through a Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES), vocational-technical schools, nursing care facilities, community colleges, and some home health agencies. Training program topics include communication and documentation skills; reading and recording vital signs; basic infection control procedures; body mechanics; maintenance of a healthy environment; emergency procedures; physical, emotional, and developmental characteristics of patients; personal hygiene and grooming; safe patient transfer techniques; normal range of motion and positioning; and healthy nutrition.

Most home health aides also receive training on-the-job by registered nurses, supervisors, or other health care providers in tasks specific to their clients. Aides also learn basic safety techniques and how to respond in an emergency. In addition, home health aides are required to complete 12 hours of in-service training each year.

The National Association for Home Care and Hospice offers certification for home health aides. http://www.nahc.org.

The Federal Government has guidelines for home health aides whose employers receive reimbursement from Medicare. Federal law requires home health aides to pass a competency test covering a wide range of areas. A home health aide may receive training before taking the competency test.

Financial Support

Many home health agencies offer free home health aide training to individuals who agree to work for them on completion of training.

Home Health Aide Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Home health aides are generally not required to have a high school diploma, although many do. Some employers provide classroom instruction for newly hired aides, while others rely exclusively on informal on-the-job instruction by registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, or experienced aides. Such training may last from several days to a few months. Aides also may attend lectures, workshops, and in-service training. Also, clients may prefer that tasks are done a certain way and may make those suggestions to the home health aide. A competency evaluation may be required to ensure the aide can perform the required tasks.

For the New York State Education Department list of home health aide training programs, click here: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/nurse/nurseprogs-hha.htm.

Some Education Programs in New York (Subject to Change)

  Corning Community College
1 Academic Dr
Corning NY  14830
607-962-9222
Finger Lakes Community College
3325 Marvin Sands Dr
Canandaigua, NY 14424
585-394-3522
Rochester Educational Opportunity Center
161 Chestnut St
Rochester, NY 14604
(585)232-2730
ASA College
Div of Continuing Education

Manhattan Campus
1293 Broadway (One Herald Center),
New York, NY 10001
(877) 679-8772
and
Brooklyn Campus
81 Willoughby Street.
Brooklyn, NY, 11201
(877) 679-8772
Hostos Community College
Div of Workforce Dev & Continuing Educ
560 Exterior St
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 518-6656
Lehman College
School of Continuing & Professional Studies
250 Bedford Park Blvd W
Bronx, NY 10468
(718) 960-8000
Westchester Educational Opportunity Program
26 South Broadway
Yonkers, NY 10701
(914) 606-7620
Fulton-Montgomery Community College
2805 State Highway 67
Johnstown, NY 12095
(518) 736-3622
Schenectady County Community College
Workforce Development & Community Education
433A State St,  2nd Fl
Schenectady, NY 12305
(518) 621-4007
SUNY University Center for Academic
& Workforce Development
ATTAIN System
Located in Albany, Binghamton, Bronx, Brooklyn,
Buffalo, Long Island, Manhattan, Monticello,
Niagara Falls, Ogdensburg, Perry, Queens, Rochester,
Staten Island, Syracuse, Watertown, and Westchester
 

 

Additional Web Links

The Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/home-health-aides.htm.

National Association for Home Care and Hospice: www.nahc.org

Healthcare Association of New York: http://www.hanys.org/

The New York State Association of Health Care Providers: http://www.nyshcp.org/

The Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute (PHI): http://phinational.org/

Visiting Nurse Associations of America: www.vnaa.org

What Do Horticultural Therapists Do?

Horticultural therapy (HT) integrates therapy with gardening for the purpose of physical and mental rehabilitation. Horticultural therapists work with a wide variety of patient diagnoses, such as physical or emotional trauma, and people with mental illness, and with many different populations, from children to teenagers and adults to the elderly. Horticultural therapists evaluate the physical and mental disabilities of patients and tailor programs to promote physical therapy, education, rehabilitation, and relaxation. Professional horticultural therapists also work closely with doctors, psychologists, psychiatrists, and occupational therapists in designing individual care plans.

HT is a beneficial and effective therapeutic modality, used within a broad range of rehabilitative, vocational, and community settings. Horticultural therapists assist participants to learn new skills or regain those that have been lost. HT helps improve memory, cognitive abilities, task initiation, language skills, and socialization. In physical rehabilitation, a horticultural therapist can help a participant strengthen muscles and improve coordination, balance, and endurance. In vocational settings, horticultural therapists can help people learn to work independently, problem solve, and follow directions.

Where Do Horticultural Therapists Work?

Horticultural therapists work in gardens; vocational, occupational, and rehabilitation programs; hospitals; clinics and skilled nursing facilities; hospice and palliative care programs; correctional facilities; public and private schools; and assisted living and senior centers.

What Do Horticultural Therapists Earn?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not yet publish employment and earnings data for horticulture therapists. According to salary.com, in 2019 the average salary for horticulture therapists in the United States is $63,776. The average salary for horticulture therapist working in New York State is slightly higher at $68,432.

Supply and Demand

There are no projections available at the national level or for New York for horticultural therapists.

New York Educational Requirements

Horticultural therapists typically hold a bachelors degree in horticulture or related field to enter into horticultural therapy. Most educational programs in the Northeast are certificate programs. The curriculum for horticultural therapists often includes courses in health and abnormal psychology, plant pathology, and crop management, as well as social and behavioral sciences.

New York Certification/Licensure Requirements

New York does not require horticultural therapists to be licensed or certified. The American Horticultural Therapy Association (AHTA) does register horticultural therapists on a voluntary basis. To become registered by the AHTA, an individual must have a bachelor’s degree in horticultural therapy; or a bachelor’s degree in another field plus required coursework in human science field, horticulture field, and horticultural therapy as outlined by the AHTA; and 480 hours of supervised internship. For specific information on registration requirements, go the www.ahta.org.

Education Programs in the Northeast U.S. (subject to change)

Rutgers University
School of Environmental & Biological Sciences
59 Dudley Road
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8520
(201) 336-6780
New York Botanical Garden
Adult Education Department
The New York Botanical Garden
2900 Southern Blvd.
Bronx, NY 10458-5126
(800) 322-NYBG (6924)
Delaware Valley College
Dept. of Natural Resources & Biosystems Management
700 E. Butler Ave.
Doylestown, PA 18901
(215) 489-2933
Temple University
Dept. of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture
580 Meetinghouse Road
Ambler, PA 19002
(267) 468-8181

Additional Web Links

For more information on Horticultural Therapy, go to:

American Horticultural Therapy Association: www.ahta.org

Horticultural Therapy Institute: http://www.htinstitute.org.

What Do Licensed Practical Nurses Do?

Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) are health professionals who work under the supervision of a registered nurse (RN) or a physician and provide basic patient care. Their duties may include:

  • Taking vital signs, monitoring patients’ health, and keeping records about patients’ health;
  • Administering medications, changing bandages, and other basic nursing care;
  • Carrying out prescribed medical and nursing treatments;
  • Educating patients and listening to their concerns and discussing their health care;
  • Supervising nursing aides in the delivery of patient services in some settings;
  • Observing, documenting, and reporting patient condition and progress to RNs and physicians; and
  • Providing emotional support to patients and their families.

For more information, go to: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/licensed-practical-and-licensed-vocational-nurses.htm.

Where Do Licensed Practical Nurses Work?

LPNs work in nursing homes, private physician practices, hospitals, and a variety of other health care settings. Most LPNs work full time, and LPNs may work nights, weekends, and holidays depending on the health care setting they work in.

What Do Licensed Practical Nurses Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, licensed practical and vocational nurses nationwide was $47,050, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that licensed practical and vocational nurses in New York earned an average annual salary of $48,410, (entry level-$37,280, experienced- $53,980).

Supply and Demand

The number of jobs for LPNs nationwide is expected to increase 12.3% between 2016 and 2026, and increase in New York by 18.4% during the same time period. As the population ages, growing demand for LPNs is expected to increase, especially in long-term care settings. Additionally, as technology advances allow more offices, clinics, and ambulatory settings to offer services that were once only available in hospitals, these settings may increase the use of LPNs.

For more information on projections of LPNs by New York labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

Licensed Practical Nurse Education Program Requirements

LPNs must complete an accredited education program, which are typically about one year in length and include clinical practice in a hospital or other health care setting and classroom study that covers basic nursing content including:

  • anatomy;
  • physiology;
  • medical-surgical nursing;
  • pediatrics;
  • obstetrics;
  • psychiatric nursing;
  • medication administration;
  • nutrition; and
  • first aid.

Some LPN educational programs are available to high school students, usually through a local BOCES. Most LPN programs are offered to adults as academic or continuing education courses through a BOCES, community or junior college, and some four-year colleges. The New York LPN to RN Articulation Model establishes a mechanism for an LPN to achieve educational mobility and expediency by eliminating barriers in nursing education programs. For more information on this program, go to: http://www.lpntorn.info/.

Financial Support

Grants, scholarships, and awards for students entering the nursing field are available at local, state, and federal levels. For more information, click here.

New York Licensure Requirements

Graduates of LPN education programs must pass an exam, known as the NCLEX-PN, to get a license and work as an LPN in New York and in all U.S. states. For more information, go to: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/nurse/.

LPN to RN CAREER LADDER PROGRAM  The Council of Practical Nurse Programs of New York State (CPNPNYS) provides a list of LPN to RN articulation programs in New York. These programs allow LPNs to complete a two-year RN degree in a calendar year. For a list of programs, visit the CPNPNYS website by clicking here.

LPN Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

To view the New York State Education Department list of all LPN programs in New York, click here.
The following list is derived from the same NYSED source.

Central Region

Delaware-Chenango-Madison-Otsego BOCES
Chenango Campus
6678 County Route 32
Norwich, NY 11315-3554
(607) 335-1200
and
Harrold Campus
270 Boces Drive
Sidney Center, NY 13839-3105
(607) 865-2500.
Cayuga-Onondaga BOCES
The Center for Learning
12 Allen Street
Auburn, NY 13021
(315) 253.4899
Broome-Delaware-Tioga BOCES
435 Glenwood Road
Binghamton, NY 13905
(607) 763-3300
Madison-Oneida BOCES
4937 Spring Road
Verona, NY 13478
(315) 361-5500
Onondaga-Cortland-Madison BOCES
Liverpool Campus
4500 Crown Road
Liverpool, NY 13090
(315) 453-4455
or
Cortland Campus
1710 State Route 13
Cortland, NY 13045
(607) 758-5111
Oswego County
Adult Education
179 County Route 64
Mexico, NY 13114
(315) 963-4251
Otsego Northern Catskills BOCES
31 Center Street 3rd floor
Oneonta, NY 13820
(607) 286-7715

Genesee Valley Region

SUNY Brockport 
Rochester Educational Opportunity Ctr.
161 Chestnut Street
Rochester, NY 14604
(585) 232-2730
Genesee Valley BOCES
(Genessee-Livingston-Steuben-Wyoming Counties)
80 Munson Street
LeRoy, NY 14482
(585) 344-7788
LPN courses also available in Batavia, Greece, and Leicester, NY
Marion S. Whelan School of Practicing Nursing
Finger Lakes Health Geneva General Hospital
196 North Street
Geneva, NY 14456
(315) 787-4005
Greater Southern Tier BOCES
Elmira Campus-Langdon Plaza
303 North Main Street
Elmira, NY 14901
and
Coopers Educational Center
9579 Vocational Drive
Painted Post, NY 14870
(607) 739-8170
Wayne-Finger Lakes BOCES
131 Drumlin Court
Newark, NY 14513
(315) 332-7400
Isabella Graham Hart School of Nursing
Rochester Regional Health Learning Center
1630 Portland Ave
Rochester, NY 14621
(585) 922-1400

Long Island Region

Eastern Suffolk BOCES
350 Martha Avenue
Bellport, NY 11713
(631) 286-6500
and
Adult Education Center
100 Second Ave
Brentwood, NY 11717
(631) 289-2200
VEEB Nassau County 
30 E Cherry Street
Hicksville, NY  11801
(516) 572-1704
Western Suffolk BOCES
Wilson Technologic Center
152 Laurel Hill Road
Northport, NY 11768
(631) 261-3600
Hunter Business School
3601 Hempstead Turnpike
Unit 19
Levittown, NY 11756
(516) 796-1000
Suffolk County Community College
Eastern Campus
121 Speonk-Riverhead Road
Riverhead, NY 11901
(631) 548-2500
 

Metropolitan Region

LaGuardia Community College
31-10 Thomson Ave.
Long Island City, NY 11101
(718) 482-5248 or
(718) 482-5774
Bronx Community College
West 181st Street and University Avenue
2155 University Avenue
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 289-5100
Hostos Community College
500 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY  10451
(718) 518-4444
Monroe College
2501 Jerome Avenue
Bronx, NY 10468
(718) 933-6700
AMG School of Licensed Practical Nursing
147 Prince Street, 2nd floor
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 596-5300
Clara Barton High School
Career & Technical Education Center
901 Classon Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11225
(718) 636-4900
Curtis High School
105 Hamilton Avenue
Staten Island, NY 10301
(718) 390-1800
or (718) 273-7380, ext.305
Mildred Elley School
25 Broadway, 16th floor
New York, NY 10004
(866) 878-0041
(212) 380-9004
Medgar Evers College
1650 Bedford Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11225
(718) 270-4900
Transition Career Institute
School of Nursing
30-50 Whitestone Expressway
Suite 400
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 362-9500

Mid-Hudson Region

Dutchess BOCES
5 BOCES Road
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601
(845) 486-8045
Orange-Ulster BOCES
53 Gibson Road
Goshen, NY 10924
Also at Middletown and Newburgh Campuses
(845) 781-4642
Ulster BOCES
Adult Career Education Center
727 Grant Ave
Lake Katrine, NY 12477
(845) 382-1281
Rockland BOCES
BOCES Educational Resource Center (BERC)
65 Parrott Rd
West Nyack, NY 10994
(845) 627-4700
Southern Westchester BOCES
Adult Education Center
450 Mamaroneck Ave.
Harrison, NY 10528
(914) 592-0849
 

Northeast Region

Capital Region BOCES
1015 Watervliet-Shaker Road
Building A
Albany, NY 12205
(518) 862-4709
Champlain Valley BOCES
1585 Military Turnpike Extension
Plattsburgh, NY 12901
(518) 561-0100
HFM BOCES
Hamilton-Fulton-Montgomery BOCES
2755 State Highway 67
Johnstown, NY 12095
(518) 736-4681
Herkimer BOCES
Herkimer-Fulton-Hamilton-Otsego
77 North Street
Ilion, NY 13357
(315) 867-2000
Maria College
700 New Scotland Avenue
Albany, NY 12208
(518) 438-3111
Mildred Elley
855 Central Avenue
Albany, NY 12206
(888) 290-3847
WSWHE BOCES
Washington-Saratoga-Warren-
Hamilton-Essex
Southern Adirondack Education Center
1051 Dix Ave
Hudson Falls, NY 12839
(518) 746-3400
Samaritan Hospital
School of Nursing
1300 Massachusetts Ave
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 268-5130
SUNY Canton
State University of New York
34 Cornell Drive
Canton, NY 13617
(315) 386-7011 or
(315) 379-3898

Northern Region

Jefferson-Lewis-Hamilton-Herkimer-Oneida BOCES
Charles Bohlen Jr Tech Center
20104 NYS Route 3
Watertown, NY 13601
(315) 779-7200
and
Howard Sacket Tech Center
5836 State Route 12
Glenfield, NY 13343
(315)377-7300
North Country Community College
23 Santanoni Avenue
Saranac Lake, NY 12983
(888) TRY-NCCC
LPN program also available in Malone, NY and Ticonderoga, NY

Western Region

Cattaraugus-Allegany BOCES
1825 Windfall Road
Olean, NY 14760
(716) 376-8278
LPN courses available in Belmont, NY
and Olean, NY
Erie I BOCES
Potter Career & Technical Center
705 Potters Rd
West Seneca, NY 14224
(716) 821-7331
and
Workforce Development Center
1526 Walden Ave, Ste 200
Cheektowaga, NY  14225
(716) 821-7500
Erie 2-Chautauqua-Cattaraugus BOCES
Hewes Education Center
2615 Maple Ave
Ashville, NY 14710
(716) 664-4866
LPN also available in Cassadaga and Buffalo, NY
Niagara County Community College-SUNY
3111 Saunders Settlement Road
Sanborn, NY 14132
(716) 614-6222
Orleans-Niagara BOCES
Orleans Career and Technical Education Center
4232 Shelby Basin Road
Medina, NY 14103
or
Workforce Training Center
606 6th St
Niagara Falls, NY 14301
(716) 731-6800, ext.4445
Trocaire College
360 Choate Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14220
(716) 826-1200

What Do Massage Therapists Do?

Massage therapists use their hands to manipulate and work a client’s muscles and soft body tissues. There are many different types of massage therapies, called modalities, such as Swedish massage, reflexology, acupressure, sports massage, reiki, and neuromuscular massage. Most massage therapists specialize in several modalities, which require different techniques.

Massage therapy can offer medical benefits by helping to rehabilitate injuries and be part of a healing process by relieving pain, body aches, and soreness. It may also help reduce stress, increase relaxation, and aid in the general wellness of a client. Massage therapy that aims to improve physical health typically differs in duration and technique from massage that is intended to simply relax or rejuvenate clients. The training background of those who perform the two types of massage therapy may differ as well.

To learn more about this profession, go to: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/massage-therapists.htm.

Where Do Massage Therapists Work?

This occupation includes a large percentage of part-time and self-employed workers. Massage therapists work in an array of settings both public and private, including hospitals, nursing homes, clinics, private practitioner offices, health spas, resorts, sports venues, fitness centers, and corporate offices. Frequently massage therapists work out of their homes or travel to their clients’ homes or offices to provide massages. It is not uncommon for full-time massage therapists to divide their time among several different settings, depending on the clients and locations scheduled.

Due to the physically strenuous nature of the job, massage therapists typically give massages for less than 40 hours a week. Most therapists who work 15 to 30 hours per week consider themselves to be full-time workers, because when time for travel, equipment set-up, and business functions such as billing are added in, a massage therapist’s hours per week may very well be more than 40 hours. Massage therapists may work evenings and weekends based on the availability of their clients or the scheduling of a setting where they work.

What Do Massage Therapists Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, massage therapists nationwide was $45,880, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that massage therapists in New York earned an average annual salary of $60,830, (entry level-$30,150, experienced- $76,170).

Supply and Demand

The number of massage therapist jobs is projected to increase in the United States by 26.3% between 2016 and 2026 and increase by 28.1% in New York during the same period.

Employment is expected to grow faster than average as more people learn about the benefits of massage therapy. Massage also offers specific benefits to particular groups of people, such as athletes or older adults, whose continued demand for massage services will lead to overall growth for the occupation.

For more information on projections of massage therapists by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

Educational Program Requirements

Licensed massage therapists have at least a high school education or G.E.D and they must complete an approved massage therapy education program. Many programs have additional admitting requirements such essays or basic proficiency in English or science. Non-credit diploma or certificate programs as well as associate and bachelor’s degree programs are currently approved in New York.

Approved massage therapy education programs require coursework in human anatomy, physiology, neurology, hygiene, massage techniques, and other elements of general health care. All approved programs require clinical training, too, with a minimum of 150 hours of practice on people.

With the self-employed nature of the massage therapy profession, many programs also offer courses in basic business and business ethics. Programs conferring associate or bachelor’s degrees may require additional elective coursework in English, writing, and other liberal arts.

New York Licensure Requirements

A massage therapist must be licensed in New York. To be licensed in New York, a massage therapist must complete an approved massage therapist training program and pass a state-approved licensing exam. For more information on New York licensure requirements, go to:  http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/mt/mtlic.htm.

Financial Support

For general information about state and federal scholarship programs and opportunities, go to: http://www.highered.nysed.gov/kiap/scholarships.

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Center for Natural Wellness
School of Massage Therapy

3 Cerone Commercial Drive
Albany, NY 12205
(518) 489-4026
Niagara County Community College
3111 Saunders Settlement Road
Sanborn, NY 14132
(716) 614-6410
Finger Lakes Community College
3325 Marvin Sands Drive
Canandaigua, NY 14424
(585) 394-3500
Finger Lakes School of Massage
215 E State St, Ste 203
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 272-9024
and
272 North Bedford Road
Mount Kisco, NY 10549
(914) 241-7363
Mildred Elley
855 Central Avenue
Albany, NY 12206
(518) 786-0855 or (888) 290-3847
Morrisville State College- SUNY
80 Eaton Street
Morrisville, NY 13408
(315) 684-6000
Trocaire College
360 Choate Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14220-2094
(716) 826-1200
North Country Community College
23 Santanoni Ave
Saranac Lake, NY 12983
(518) 891-2915
New York College of Health Professions
6801 Jericho Tpke.
Syosset, NY 11791
1-800-922-7337
New York Institute of Massage
4701 Transit Road
Williamsville, NY 14221
(716) 633-0355
Pacific College of Oriental Medicine
110 William Street
New York, NY  10038
(212) 982-3456
Queensborough Community College- CUNY
222-05 56th Avenue
Bayside, NY 11364
(718) 631-6262
Swedish Institute
226 W 26th Street
New York, NY 10001
(212) 924-5900

 

Additional Web Links

For more information on massage therapists, go to:

American Massage Therapy Association: www.amtamassage.org

Associated Bodywork and Massage Professionals: http://www.abmp.com

National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork: http:// www.ncbtmb.org

New York State Society of Medical Massage Therapists: www.nysmassage.org.

What Do Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians Do?

Medical and clinical laboratory technologists and technicians collect samples and perform tests to analyze body fluids, tissue, and other substances.

Medical and clinical laboratory technologists and technicians have different job responsibilities: technologists perform more complex tests and procedures than do technicians, and they typically supervise technicians.

Medical and clinical laboratory technologists examine blood and other body fluids, analyze samples for chemical content or a chemical reaction, and determine concentrations of compounds such as blood glucose and cholesterol levels. They also collect and study blood samples for use in transfusions by identifying the number of cells, the cell morphology or the blood group, blood type, and compatibility with other blood types. In their work, they operate sophisticated laboratory equipment and computerized instruments. They may also supervise or train medical laboratory technicians.

Medical and clinical laboratory technicians perform less complex tests and laboratory procedures than technologists and usually work under the supervision of medical or clinical laboratory technologists or a laboratory manager.

Both medical and clinical technologists and technicians may specialize in a particular type of work. For more information about the various specialties, go to: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-and-clinical-laboratory-technologists-and-technicians.htm

Where Do Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians Work?

More than half of medical and clinical laboratory technologists and technicians work in hospitals. Most of the remaining jobs were in physician offices and in medical and diagnostic laboratories. A small number work in educational services and other ambulatory health care services.

What Do Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, medical and clinical laboratory technologists and technicians nationwide was $53,880, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports medical and clinical laboratory technologists and technicians in New York earned an average annual salary of $62,040, (entry level-$39,920, experienced- $73,100).

Supply and Demand

The BLS projects that between 2016 and 2026 in the U.S., the number of jobs will increase by 11.5% for medical and clinical laboratory technologists and by 14.0% for technicians. In New York, the number of jobs for medical and clinical laboratory technologists will increase by 15.1% , and by 18.8% for technicians during the same period. The volume of laboratory tests continues to increase with both population growth and the development of new types of tests. Hospitals in New York continue to report difficultly recruiting medical and clinical laboratory technicians and technologists, especially technicians.

For more information on employment projections of medical and clinical laboratory technologists and technicians by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

Educational Program Requirements

The usual requirement for an entry-level position as a medical and clinical laboratory technologist is a bachelor’s degree with a major in medical technology or one of the life sciences; however, it is possible to qualify for some jobs with a combination of education and on-the-job, specialized training. Many universities and hospitals offer medical technology programs, which may include  courses in chemistry, biology, microbiology, mathematics, and statistics as well as specialized courses devoted to knowledge and skills used in the clinical laboratory.

Clinical laboratory technicians may have an associate degree or a training certificate from a hospital, vocational, or technical school, or the Armed Forces. Some technicians may acquire the necessary skills with on-the-job training.

New York Licensure Requirements

New York requires licensure for those who work using the titles of clinical laboratory technologist or certified clinical laboratory technician, or cytotechnologist or certified histological technician. Licensure requires meeting certain educational and examination criteria for each profession.

For details about New York licensing requirements, please go to: www.op.nysed.gov/prof/clt/.

Certification

Many employers prefer applicants who are certified by a recognized professional association. Groups offering certification include the American Society for Clinical Pathology, the American Medical Technologists, the National Credentialing Agency for Laboratory Personnel, National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, and the American Association of Bioanalysts. Each of these agencies have different requirements for certification.

Financial Support

The National Accrediting Agency of Clinical Laboratory Sciences offers scholarship information from a number of sources for medical and clinical laboratory students on their website at: http://www.naacls.org/Students.aspx.

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

Clinical Laboratory Science and Medical Technology or Technician Programs

Canisius College
2001 Main Street
Buffalo, NY 14208-1517
(716) 888-7000
Monroe Community College (Technician)
1000 E Henrietta Drive
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 292-2029
College of Staten Island-CUNY
2800 Victory Boulevard
Staten Island, NY 10314
(718) 982-2000
Elmira College
One Park Place
Elmira, NY 14901
(800) 935-6472
Hartwick College
1 Hartwick Drive
Oneonta, NY 13820
(607) 431-4000
Hunter College- CUNY
Brookdale Campus, 7th floor
695 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10065
(212) 481-4442 or (212) 772-4000
Mercy College
555 Broadway
Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522
(914) 674-7600
Long Island University- Post
School of Health Professions and Nursing
720 Northern Blvd
Brookville, NY 11548
(516) 299-2900
Marist College
3399 North Road
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601
(845) 575-3000
The College at Brockport – SUNY
350 New Campus Drive
Brockport, NY 14420
(585) 395-5755
SUNY Plattsburgh
101 Broad Street
Plattsburgh, NY 12901
(518) 564-2000
University at Buffalo- SUNY
School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
26 Cary Hall, South Campus
Buffalo, NY 14214-3005
(716) 645-6900
Nassau Community College (Technician)
One Education Drive
Garden City, NY 11530-6793
(516) 572-7501
Stony Brook University
School of Health Technology & Management
101 Nicolls Road
Stony Brook, NY 11794
(631) 444-2252
Upstate Medical University-SUNY
College of Health Professions
766 Irving Ave
Syracuse, NY 13210
(315) 464-6560
SUNY Orange Community College  (Technician)
115 South Street
Middletown, NY 10940
(845) 344-6222
St. John’s University
8000 Utopia Parkway
Queens, NY 11439
(718) 990-2000
St. Thomas Aquinas College
125 Route 340
Sparkill, NY 10976
(845) 398-4100
York College-CUNY
Department of Health Professions
94-20 Guy R. Brewer Boulevard
Jamaica, NY 11451
(718) 262-2000
Bronx Community College   (Technician)
2155 University Avenue
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 289-5100
Broome Community College (Technician)
907 Upper Front St
Binghamton, NY 13905
(607) 778-5000
Farmingdale State College
2350 Broadhollow Road
Farmingdale, NY 11735-1021
(631) 420-2000
Dutchess Community College (Technician)
53 Pendell Road
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601
(845) 431-8000
Erie Community College
North Campus
6205 Main Street
Williamsville, NY 14221
(716) 851-1322
Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences
106 New Scotland
Albany, NY 12208
(518) 694-7130 or (518) 694-7200
 The College of Saint Rose
432 Western Avenue
Albany, New York 12203
(800) 637-8556
SUNY Fredonia
280 Central Ave
Fredonia, NY 14063
(716) 673-3111
 Onondaga Cortland Madison BOCES (Technician)
6820 Thompson Road
Syracuse, NY
(315) 433-2635

Histotechnology Programs

SUNY Cobleskill
106 Suffolk Circle
Cobleskill, NY 12043
(518) 255-5011

Cytotechnology Programs

SUNY Plattsburgh
101 Broad Street
Plattsburgh, NY 12901
(518) 564-2000
Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences
106 New Scotland
Albany, NY 12208
(518) 694-7130 or (518) 694-7200
 

 

Additional Web Links

For more information on CLPs and all the other associated professions, go to:

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences website at: http://www.naacls.org

American Society for Clinical Pathology website at: http://www.ascp.org

American Society for Cytotechnology website at: http://www.asct.com

National Society for Histotechnology website at: http://www.nsh.org

American Medical Technologists website at: http://www.americanmedtech.org/Home.aspx

American Association of Bioanalysts website at: http://www.aab.org/aab/default.asp.

What Do Medical Assistants Do?

Medical assistants perform administrative and clinical tasks to keep the offices of physicians, podiatrists, chiropractors, and other health practitioners running smoothly. Medical assistants aid office staff and health care practitioners in daily operations. Administrative duties include answering telephones, scheduling appointments, greeting patients, updating and filing patient medical records, arranging for hospital admissions, and some billing and bookkeeping tasks. Clinical duties vary according to what is allowed by each state’s law. Clinical responsibilities may include such tasks as taking medical histories from patients and recording their vital signs, explaining treatment procedures to patients, preparing patients for examinations, and providing assistance during exams.

For more information about medical assistants, please see: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-assistants.htm.

Where Do Medical Assistants Work?

The majority of medical assistants work in the offices of physicians and other health care providers, although a large number also work in hospitals.

Most full-time medical assistants work a regular 40-hour week. However, many medical assistants work part time, evenings, and weekends, too.

What Do Medical Assistants Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, medical assistants nationwide was $34,540 varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that medical assistants in New York earned an average annual salary of $37,270, (entry level-$28,530, experienced- $41,620).

Supply and Demand

Between 2016 and 2026, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the number of medical assistant jobs in the U.S. will increase by 29.0%, and will increase in New York by 35.1% during the same period.

Helping to drive this excellent job growth is the increasing number of group practices, clinics, and other health care facilities that need a high proportion of support personnel, particularly medical assistants who can handle both administrative and some clinical duties. In addition, medical assistants work mostly in primary care, a consistently growing sector of the health care industry.

For more information on the need for medical assistants by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

New York Educational Requirements

Formal educational programs in medical assisting are offered in vocational-technical high schools, postsecondary vocational schools, community and junior colleges, as well as some colleges and universities. These programs generally last one or two years, culminating in a certificate, diploma, or associate degree. Some medical assistants receive on-the-job training in the form of four- to six-week programs, but this is less common today than in the past.

New York Licensure Requirements

While New York does not require medical assistants to be licensed, individuals wishing to demonstrate proficiency in their occupation may receive certification through national organizations such as the American Association of Medical Assistants, www.aama-ntl.org and American Medical Technologists, https://www.americanmedtech.org/.

Financial Support

American Medical Technologists Registry offers scholarships for medical assistant students. For more information go to: http://www.americanmedtech.org/Schools/ScholarshipsAwards.aspx.

Education Programs in New York (Subject to Change)

Bronx Educational Opportunity Center 
1666 Bathgate Ave
Bronx, NY 10457
(718) 530-7000
Brooklyn Educational
Opportunity Center 
111 Livingston St.
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 802-3358
Allen School of Health Sciences
163-18 Jamaica Avenue
Jamaica, NY 11432
or
188 Montague Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(888) 620-6745
ASA College
Manhattan Campus
1293 Broadway
New York, NY 10001
or
Brooklyn Campus
81 Willoughby Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(866) 990-6148
SUNY – Broome
907 Upper Front St.
Binghamton, NY 13905
(607) 778-5495
Bryant & Stratton College
Medical assistant education programs in the
Albany area, Buffalo area, Rochester area,
Liverpool and Syracuse area.
For contact information for each campus,
go to: www.bryantstratton.edu/Contact.aspx
Erie Community College
North Campus
Health Sciences Division
6205 Main Street
Williamsville, NY 14221
(716) 851-1553
Elmira Business Institute
Main Campus – Langdon Plaza
303 N. Main St.
Elmira, NY 14901
(607) 733-7177
and
Vestal Executive Park
4100 Vestal Rd.
Vestal, NY 13850
(607) 729-8915
Buffalo Educational Opportunity Center
555 Ellicott St.
Buffalo, NY 14203
(716) 645-9555
Mandl School
The College of Allied Health

254 W 54th Street
New York, NY 10019
(212) 247-3434
Mildred Elley School
Albany Campus
855 Central Avenue
Albany, NY 12206
(888) 290-3847
or
Manhattan Campus
25 Broadway, Floor 16
New York, NY 10004
(866) 878-0041
New York Medical Career Training Center
36-09 Main Street, 5th floor
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 460-1717
or
500 8th Avenue, 5th floor
(between 35th-36th Streets)
New York, NY 10018
(212) 947-4444
The New York School for Medical and Dental Assistants
33-10 Queens Boulevard
Long Island City, NY 11101-2327
(718) 793-2330
Niagara County Community College
3111 Saunders Settlement Road
Sanborn, NY 14132
(716) 614-6222
Trocaire College
360 Choate Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14220-2094
(716) 826-1200
Queensborough Community College
222-05 56th Ave
Bayside, NY  11364
(718) 631-6262
Branford Hall Career Institute
500 Karner Rd
Albany, NY 12205
(518) 456-4464 or
or
565 Johnson Avenue
Bohemia, NY 11716
(631) 589-1222
or
1100 North Broadway
Amityville, NY 11701
(631) 608-9113
Monroe College
2501 Jerome Ave.
Bronx, NY 10468
(718) 933-6700
or
434 Main St.
New Rochelle, NY 10801
(914) 632-5400
Swedish Institute
College of Health Sciences
226 West 26th Street
New York, NY 10001
(212) 924-5900 ext.199
Columbia Greene Community College
4400 Route 23
Hudson, NY 12534
(518) 828-4181
Manhattan Institute
45 West 34th Street,
5th floor
New York, NY 10001
(347) 220-8181
Onondaga Cortland Madison BOCES
110 Elwood Davis Road
Liverpool, NY 13088
(315) 453-4455
or
1710 NYS Rte 13
Cortland, NY 13045
(607) 758-5111
Center for Instruction, Technology & Innovation (Citi)
179 County Route 64
Mexico, NY 13114
(315) 963-4251
Access Careers 
474 Fulton Ave.
Hempstead, NY 11550
(516) 433-0034
or
Islandia Campus
1930 Veterans Highway Ste 10
Islandia, NY 11749
(631) 630-9410
Ace Institute of Technology
312 W 36th St. 2nd Fl.
New York, NY 10018
(212) 695-9700
or
4040 75th St,  Ste. 4038
Elmhurst, NY 11373
(718) 575-3223
The College of Westchester
325 Central Ave
White Plains, NY 10606
(855) 403-7722
Career School of New York
350 St Marks Place
Staten Island, NY 10301
(718) 420-6440
Hunter Business School
3601 Hempstead Turnpike, Unit 19
Levittown, NY 11756
(516) 796-1000
or
3247 Route 112, Bldg 3
Medford, NY 11763
(631) 736-7360
St. Paul’s School of Nursing
97-77 Queens Blvd
Queens, NY 11374
(718) 357-0500
or
Corporate Commons
22 Teleport Dr., Ste. 203
Staten Island, NY 10311
(718) 818-6470
SUNY Sullivan
112 College Road
Loch Sheldrake, NY 12759
(845) 434-5750
New Age Training
145 West 30th Street, 8th Fl
New York, NY 10001
(212) 947-7940
 Westchester School for Dental Assistants
33 W Main Street, Ste 206
Elmsford, NY  10523
(914) 682-9001
Plaza College
118-33 Queens Blvd
Forest Hills, NY 11375
(718) 779-1430
 

Medical Office Assistant Programs

Bronx Community College
2155 University Avenue
Bronx, NY 10453
(718) 289-5100
Queensborough Community College
222-05 56th Avenue
Bayside, NY 11364
(718) 631-6262
Jamestown Business College
7 Fairmount Avenue
Jamestown, NY 14701
(716) 664-5100
 

What Do Medical Billers Do?

Medical billers calculate health care provider charges, develop bills, and prepare them to be mailed to patients. By reviewing medical and hospital records and making or verifying calculations, they ensure that even the most complicated bills are accurate. Medical billers are responsible for timely submission of medical claims to insurance companies. Medical billers most often work with electronic billing systems and are responsible to make sure that patient, provider, and insurance information is correct and that fair payments are made. Medical billers may also be responsible for crediting patient accounts, appealing reimbursement denials, and tracking accounts receivables for providers.

Day-to-day responsibilities for medical billers will vary from location to location, but may include:

  • Reviewing patient bills for accuracy and completeness and obtaining any missing information
  • Knowledge of insurance guidelines, especially Medicare and state Medicaid
  • Following up on unpaid claims within standard billing cycle timeframes
  • Checking each insurance payment for accuracy
  • Calling insurance companies regarding any discrepancy in payments, if necessary
  • Identifying and billing secondary or tertiary insurances
  • Making sure all accounts are reviewed for insurance or patient follow-up
  • Answering all patient or insurance telephone inquiries pertaining to assigned accounts

Where Do Medical Billers Work?

Medical billers work in a variety of health care settings, including hospitals, nursing homes, physician offices, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, and health clinics. Billing clerks are typically employed in an office environment, although a growing number—particularly medical billers—work from home or a separate office, either as independent contractors or with firms that specialize in medical billing.

Most billing clerks typically work 40 hours per week during regular business hours.

What Do Medical Billers Earn?

According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, medical billers nationwide was $39,520, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that medical billers in New York earned an average annual salary of $43,920, (entry level-$31,050, experienced- $50,410).

Supply and Demand

The medical billing occupation is expected to see strong growth in the health care industry as numerous recent state and federal reforms will make health care available to many more people. The BLS projects that between 2016 and 2026, the number of jobs for Billing and Posting Clerks will increase by 14.1% nationwide. The New York State Department of Labor projects that the number of jobs will increase by 22.4% in New York during the same period.

For more information on projections of Billing and Posting Clerks by New York labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

Education Requirements

Most jobs in this occupation require only a high school diploma; however, many employers prefer to hire workers who have a degree or have completed some college courses such as communication, accounting, and basic computer courses.

Medical billers can obtain training in a variety of ways, including on-the-job or through certificate or associate degree education programs and Web-based learning. Many community colleges and other colleges offer certificate programs in medical billing that generally take between two and three semesters and usually consist of courses in medical terminology, accounting, basic anatomy and physiology, and medical reimbursement methods.

Traditionally, billers have either been trained on-the-job or have been medical coders who do both the coding and billing. However, the shortage of coders and the growing demand for skilled medical billing specialists have employers looking for professionals who know billing basics.

New York Licensure Requirements

While New York does not require medical billers to be licensed or certified, national professional groups, such as the American Medical Billing Association, offer certified medical reimbursement specialist (CMRS) certification. Please visit AMBA’s website for more information: www.ambanet.net/AMBA.htm. In addition, the American Academy of Professional Coders, http://www.aapc.com/, also offers medical billers credentials based on passing a qualifying exam and experience and education.

Financial Support

It may be possible to obtain financial assistance for training and education from an employer. Also, colleges and organizations that provide training for those wishing to become medical billers may have scholarships.

Educational Programs in New York (subject to change)

Most jobs in this occupation require only a high school diploma, though many employers prefer workers with some billing, accounting, or customer service experience.

Information about education programs is offered by AMBA on their Web page “Medical Billing 101”: ambanet.net.

Many educational programs to become medical billers are offered online or on campus through BOCES schools, community colleges, and City University of New York (CUNY) schools, and State of New York (SUNY) colleges. Contact these agencies or search your geographic area online to find medical billing education programs convenient to you.

A sampling of education programs are listed below. 

Access Careers
474 Fulton Ave.
Hempstead, NY 11550
(516) 433-0034
and
1930 Veterans Hwy
Islandia, NY 11749
(631) 630-9410
ABC Training Center
1 East Fordham Rd. 2nd floor
Bronx, NY 10468
(718) 364-6700
Berkeley College
3 E 43rd St &
12 E 41st St
New York, NY  10017
(866) 317-6087
Also, campuses in Brooklyn
& White Plains, NY
College of Staten Island
Office of Continuing Education
130 Merrill Ave
Staten Island, NY 10314
(718) 982-2182
Bryant & Stratton College
Programs available at Albany, Amherst,
Buffalo, Greece, Henrietta,
Southtowns, Syracuse, and
Liverpool campuses.
(866) 948-0571
Schenectady County Community College
78 Washington Avenue
Schenectady, NY 12305
(518) 381-1200
Hostos Community College
500 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 518-4444
Hudson Valley Community College
80 Vandenburgh Ave.
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 629-4822
Hunter Business School
3601 Hempstead Turnpike
Levittown, NY 11756
(516) 796-1000
or
3247 Route 112, Bldg # 3
Medford, NY 11763
(631) 736-7360
The Manhattan Institute
45 W 34th St, 5th floor
New York, NY 10001
(347) 220-8181
Branford Hall Career Institute
1100 North Broadway
Amityville, NY 11701
(631) 608-9113
New York Medical Career Training Institute
36-09 Main Street, 5th floor
Flushing, NY 11354
(718) 460-1717
or
500 8th Avenue, 5th floor
(between 35th-36th Streets)
New York, NY 10018
(212) 947-4444
Plaza College
118-33 Queens Blvd
Forest Hills, NY  11375
(718) 505-4188
Kingsborough Community College
2001 Oriental Boulevard
Brooklyn, NY 11235-2398
(718) 368-5200
Mohawk Valley Community College
Utica Campus
1101 Sherman Drive
Payne Hall 348
Utica, NY 13501
(315) 792-5400
or
Rome Campus
1101 Floyd Ave.
Rome NY 13440
(315) 339-3470
Elmira Business Institute
Langdon Plaza
303 N. Main Street
Elmira, NY 14901
(607) 733-7177
or
Vestal Executive Park
4100 Vestal Road
Vestal, NY 13850
(607) 729-8915
Ace Institute of Technology
312 W 36th St. 2nd Fl.
New York, NY 10018
(212) 695-9700
or
4040 75th St., Ste. 4038
(718) 575-3223
ASA College
Manhattan Campus
Herald Center Mall
1293 Broadway (One Herald Center)
New York, NY 10001
or
Brooklyn Campus
81 Willoughby Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(866) 990-6148
Brooklyn Educational
Opportunity Center
Certificate Program
111 Livingston St.
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 802-3358
Queens Educational Opportunity Center
Certicate Program
15829 Archer Ave.
Jamaica, NY 11433
(718) 725-3320
Hunter College
695 Park Ave
New York, NY 10065
(212) 650-3850
Queens College, CUNY
65-30 Kissena Blvd
Queens, NY  11367
(718) 997-5000
Lehman College
250 Bedford Park Blvd W
Bronx, NY 10468
(718) 960-8000
The City College of New York
160 Convent Ave
New York, NY 10031
(212) 650-7000
Borough of Manhattan
Community College-CUNY
Center for Continuing Educ & Workforce Dev
25 Broadway, 8th FL
New York, NY 10004
(212)346-8410
 York College-CUNY
Continuing & Professional Educ Center
94-43 160th St
Jamaica, NY  11451
(718) 262-2000
Bronx Community College
Workforce Dev & Continuing Educ
2155 University Ave
Bronx, NY  10453
(718) 289-5170
Queensborough Community College-CUNY
Continuing Educ & Workforce Dev
222-05 56th Ave
Bayside, NY 11364
(718) 631-6343
Westchester Community College
75 Grasslands Road
Valhalla, NY, 10595
(914) 606-6661
LaGuardia Community College
31-10 Thomson Ave
Long Island City, NY  11101
(718) 482-7244
Swedish Institute
College of Health Sciences
226 West 26th St.
New York, NY 10001
(212) 924-5900 ext. 199
 

What Do Medical Coders Do?

Medical coders are health information technicians who assign codes used for the billing and reimbursement of health services. These codes describe both the diagnosis of the patient and the services rendered by the health care provider. Codes may differ depending on whether the medical coder works in a hospital or clinic and the type of services provided.

These coding sets are revised on a regular basis requiring medical coders to stay current on the changes as well as on any new reimbursement procedures. In some instances, medical coders are responsible for keeping medical and administrative staff informed about changes in the coding sets, too. With the move toward electronic medical records, medical coders are expected to be familiar with and use a number of different computer software programs to access clinical records and input codes.

Medical coders may also review patient information for preexisting conditions such as diabetes, retrieve patient records for medical personnel, and work as a liaison between the health clinician and billing offices.

This is one of the few health-related occupations in which there is little or no direct contact with patients. Because accuracy is essential in their jobs, medical coders must pay close attention to detail.

For more information, go to: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-records-and-health-information-technicians.htm.

Where Do Medical Coders Work?

Medical coders primarily work in health care settings, including hospitals, private physician offices, clinics, and nursing homes. They may also work in other settings such as health care consulting firms and insurance companies.

Medical coders usually work a 40-hour week. Some overtime may be required. In hospitals—where health information departments are often open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week—some medical coders may work day, evening, and night shifts.

What Do Medical Coders Earn?

Medical coders are part of a larger Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) occupational category, “Medical Records and Health Information Technicians.” According to the 2018 BLS, the average salary for full time, medical coders nationwide was $44,010, varying by specialty and geographic region. Average annual salary also varies greatly across New York State, depending on location. The NYSDOL reports that medical coders in New York earned an average annual salary of $46,920, (entry level-$31,210, experienced- $54,780).

Supply and Demand

Between 2016 and 2026, the BLS projects that the total number of medical records and health information technicians jobs in New York will increase by 20.9%, and increase by 13.5% nationwide.

Employment growth for medical coders will result from the increase in the number of medical tests, treatments, and procedures that will be performed as the population ages and is likely to have more health-related problems. In addition, because of state and federal health care reform legislation, more Americans are expected to get health insurance and the use of electronic health records is also expected to grow. Therefore, more medical coders will be needed for patient and electronic data management.

For more information on the projected need for medical records and health information technicians by New York State labor regions, 2014-2024, click here.

Educational Program Requirements

Medical coders may obtain an associate degree from a community or junior college. Some schools may link medical coding with medical billing for a combined degree. The education programs in medical coding generally take between two and three semesters and consist of courses in medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, computer skills, and coding data sets.

Many employers favor technicians who have become Registered Health Information Technicians (RHIT). Advancement opportunities for medical record and health information technicians are typically achieved by specialization or promotion to a management position.

New York Licensure Requirements

While New York does not require medical coders to be licensed or certified, national professional associations such as the American Health Information Management Association, http://www.ahima.org, and the American Academy of Professional Coders, http://www.aapc.com/, may offer medical coders credentials based on passing a qualifying exam and experience and education.

Financial Support

Scholarships, loans, and other financial support may be available at many of the schools, colleges, and various training institutions. Additionally, AHIMA offers scholarships for individuals enrolled in Health Information Technology programs. For more information on AHIMA scholarships, go to: http://ahimafoundation.org/default.aspx?a=1.

Education Programs in New York (subject to change)

This is a sampling of medical coding education programs.

Alfred State
SUNY-College of Technology

10 Upper College Drive
Alfred, NY 14802
(800) 425-3733
Borough of Manhattan Community College-CUNY
Center for Continuing Educ & Workforce Dev25 Broadway, 8th FL
New York, NY 10004
(212)346-8410
Branford Hall Career Institute
1100 North Broadway
Amityville, NY 11701
(631) 608-9113
ABC Training Center
1 East Fordham Rd. 2nd fl
Bronx, NY 10468
(718) 364-6700
Bryant & Stratton College
Medical Coding education programavailable at
Albany, Amherst, Buffalo, Greece
Henrietta, Southtowns, Syracuse,
and Syracuse North campuses.
(866) 948-0571
For contact information for each location, go to: www.bryantstratton.edu/contact_us.aspx
Berkeley College
99 Church Street
White Plains, NY 10601
(914) 694-1122
*classes also offered at Brooklyn and two New York City locations
Elmira Business Institute
Langdon Plaza
303 N. Main Street
Elmira, NY 14901
(607) 733-7177
or
Vestal Executive Park
4100 Vestal Road
Vestal, NY 13850
(607) 729-8915
Mohawk Valley Community College
Utica Campus
1101 Sherman Drive
Utica, NY 13501
(315) 792-5400
or
Rome Campus
1101 Floyd Ave.
Rome NY 13440
(315) 339-3470
Swedish Institute
College of Health Sciences
226 West 26th St.
New York, NY 10001
(212) 924-5900 ext. 199
 
Kingsborough Community College
2001 Oriental Boulevard
Brooklyn, NY 11235-2398
(718) 368-5050
Schenectady County Community College
78 Washington Avenue
Schenectady, NY 12305
(518) 381-1200
Hostos Community College
500 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10451
(718) 518-4444
Hunter College
School of Continuing Education
695 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10065
(212) 650-3850
Westchester Community College-SUNY
75 Grasslands Road
Valhalla, NY, 10595
(914) 606-6661
York College-CUNY
Continuing & Professional Educ Ctr
94-43 160th St
Jamaica, NY  11451
(718) 262-2000
Access Careers
474 Fulton Ave.
Hempstead, NY 11550
(516) 433-0034
or
1930 Veterans Hwy
Islandia, NY 11749
(631) 630-9410
College of Staten Island
Office of Continuing Education
130 Merrill Ave
Staten Island, NY 10314
(718) 982-2182
Ace Institute of Technology
312 W 36th St. 2nd Fl.
New York, NY 10018
(212) 695-9700
or
4040 75th St., Ste. 4038
(718) 575-3223
ASA College
Manhattan Campus
Herald Center Mall
1293 Broadway (One Herald Center)
New York, NY 10001
or
Brooklyn Campus
81 Willoughby Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(866) 990-6148
Herkimer County Community College
100 Reservoir Road
Herkimer, NY 13350
(315) 866-0300
 Lehman College
250 Bedford Park Blvd W
Bronx, NY 10468
(718) 960-8000
Hudson Valley Community College
80 Vandenburgh Ave
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 629-4822
Plaza College
118-33 Queens Blvd
Forest Hills, NY  11375
(718) 505-4188
Hunter College
695 Park Ave
New York, NY 10065
(212) 650-3850
Queens College, CUNY
65-30 Kissena Blvd
Queens, NY  11367
(718) 997-5000
The City College of New York
160 Convent Ave
New York, NY 10031
(212) 650-7000
Bronx Community College
Workforce Dev & Continuing Educ
2155 University Ave
Bronx, NY  10453
(718) 289-5170
Queensborough Community College-CUNY
Continuing Educ & Workforce Dev
222-05 56th Ave
Bayside, NY 11364
(718) 631-6343
Berkeley College
3 E 43rd St &
12 E 41st St
New York, NY  10017
(866) 317-6087
Also, campuses in Brooklyn & White Plains, NY
Queens Educational Opportunity Center
Certificate Program
15829 Archer Ave.
Jamaica, NY 11433
(718) 725-3320
Westchester Educational Opportunity Center
26 South Broadway
Yonkers, NY 10701
(914) 606-7621

Additional Web Links

For more information about medical coders, go to:

The American Health Information Management Association: www.ahima.org

The New York Health Information Management Association: http://www.nyhima.org/

The American Academy of Professional Coders: www.aapc.com

 

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